creative Therapy


Giveaway Time!
October 27, 2010, 11:43 am
Filed under: other

Our very generous donor Sakura of America is giving away a fantastic prize to one creative therapy reader.

 

You can win these amazing set of Gelly Roll Stardust Meteor Colors.

 

 

All you have to do is leave us a comment here and we will pick a winner. I apologize for the inconvenience but this particular giveaway is open to only United States and Canada residents. We will pick the recipients on November 10.

 

Thank you so much to Sakura of America and if you’ve never visited their site, you really should, they make the most amazing pens.

 

 



Catalyst One Hundred and Twenty-Two
October 20, 2010, 10:00 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number one hundred and twenty-two:

 

Create a postcard. Who’s it going to?

 

We’re thrilled to have Danita Art as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a quickie self-bio for Danita:

 

I’m Danita Art and I love making things. I’m a self taught artist and I work mostly at night, when my daughter is sleeping and I can concentrate fully in what I do. I love green, blue and pink, elephants, the smell of wet dirt, rainy days and a good and juicy watermelon.

 

Make sure to check out Danita’s blog. and here amazing etsy shop.

 

 

 

Here is Danita’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and a lot more detail.

 

 

 

Danita Says:

Everybody is always telling me that I’m on the moon, specially my husband. He frequently says “Earth to Danita, Earth to Danita” because he says that I spend a lot of time daydreaming. I made him this postcard from the moon because I wish he could join me there to understand why I love being there. Reality is an ugly thing in the city I live and it’s a thing I prefer to ignore to keep me sane and I enjoy my mind trips a lot ;)

 

Technique Highlight:

I used Watercolor paper cold press for the postcard and tube watercolors. I draw the moon and the girl with pencil and then painted them with my watercolors first with a big brush and then the details with a smaller one. When the sky was still wet I sprinkle it with sea salt and removed it when it was dry to make the stars. When everything was finished I outlined it with a black marker. In the back I used a wash of 3 colors and a glitter pen for the text. Everything was edited a little bit using Photoshop, and it was ready to go!

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Larissa:

 

Larissa Says:

Here´s my postcard. Not much to share. It´s going to “a certain someone”

 

 


Dina:

 

Dina Says:

My postcards are actually two large mail-art tags. I painted & stamped them, and I’m going to send them to a couple of friends who have sent me amazing mail art in the past. I highly recommend creating mail-art. It feels great to send it and great to receive it!

 

 


Karen:

Journaling Reads:

I took this photo a while ago and I loved it. I love so many things about it that I cannot even begin to explain. But I wanted to take this photo, make a card of it and send it myself to remind myself that each day is ephemeral and that I need to live it with full emotion and passion and suck everything out of each of my days. To make the very best of them.

 

 


Amy:

Amy Says:

This “postcard” captures my view on a recent trip to the Oregon coast. The lush lines of the quilt draped over the fence and against the backdrop of sand, sea, and sky was wonderful.

 

 


Carole:

 

Carole Says:

It is for my darling mum whom I love so very much. Both Mum and I love anything to do with Paris, so I thought it would be lovely to created a Post Card for Mum with all things Pretty and Paris. I will post this to my Mum for her Birthday.

 

 


Karola:

 

Karola Says:

I decided to make a postcard for my girlfriend, with whom I love to talk on a daily basis. We share joys, sorrows as well as the usual tips for everyday life. This friendship means a lot to me and I can not imagine that we were not able to continue! I made a postcard for her to know how is close for me.

 

 


Wendela:

 

Wendela Says:

I made this one for my sons teacher. Last week she gave birth to a sweet little daughter.

 

 


Opal:

 

Opal Says:

The very old, silvery weathered and perfectly curved Adirondack chair is my favorite place to sit and watch the views from my deck. These postcards show my four favorite views: morning light; summer sunset; winter snow flurries; and a starry night with the moon’s reflection on the water. What would I write on the backs? “Wish you were here!” (of course)….and send these whom? Someone who wouldn’t mind sitting in the other Adirondack chair and watching the views here in paradise. Each postcard is a tiny quilt measuring 4″x6″.

 

 


Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “Create a postcard. Who’s it going to?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work so we can share in your creative therapy, too. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst One Hundred and Twenty-One
October 6, 2010, 8:00 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number one hundred and twenty-one:

 

How was/is your relationship with your parents?

 

We’re thrilled to have Dianne Hicks as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a quickie self-bio for Dianne:

 

Dianne Hicks was born in Evansville, Indiana but moved to Texas before the age of two. Now a Texan at heart, she lives in Lewisville where she works from her studio space in her home. Her first experience in art was taking oil painting classes with her Mom in grade school, then later moved to formal watercolor classes. Dianne also loves experimenting with paper which she began incorporating into her watercolors. Her collage papers are most often made from pattern papers that she has printed using hand carved stamps. After receiving her painting and drawing degree from the University of North Texas, she now teaches classes and works from her studio creating her watercolors and collage pieces. Her love of paper and collage has led her to work in not only large scale watercolor mixed media pieces but also, bookmaking, altered book and small collage pieces. Her Alice in Wonderland altered children’s board book was recently (March/April 2010) featured in Somerset Studio. Her work can be seen in the Crosstimbers Artist Guild Gallery in Highland Village, Texas and during the Crosstimbers Stuido Tour in November.

 

Make sure to check out Dianne’s blog.

 

 

 

Here is Dianne’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and a lot more detail.

 

 

 

Dianne Says:

Parenting is a delicate balance of give and take, balance and imbalance, discipline and letting go. I had all of the above. One parent usually takes a more important role and that was my mom. My Mom was always there for me. My Dad was a wonderful provider and was very proud of everything he did. My Mom died from pancreatic cancer, I should of spent more time with her. My Dad now 90 doing good even after a heart attack and five bypass surgery. I am lucky to have them for so long and to have had parents that gave me strength and guidance to be who I am today.

 

Technique Highlight:

My journal page was created on watercolor paper. I started by laying downing acrylic paint in pretty dark colors and while still damp stamping a pattern with hand carved stamps in several Golden acrylic colors. I start small collages this way. It creates a background that the rest can be built on. I then took photos of a painting that I did of my Mom and Dad and altered it on the computer. I used oil pastels to add color to the faces and then cut them apart. After adhering it to the watercolor paper I journaled my text on the page with a Sharpie paint pin. I intentionally wanted my mom to be the brightest figure on the page.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Larissa:

 

Larissa Says:

My relationship with my parents is full of conflicts, contrasts and traumas. It’s a relation of love with all its ambiguity. I have deeper feelings and their characteristics. Every single day.

 

I look in the mirror and I see my mother’s eyes.

 

I distrust people, I keep any gesture of them that make me feel uncomfortable or suspicious. I restrain an emotion or feeling and I see my father. I can’t make mistakes, if I have an obligation to do, a deadline to accomplish I can’t leave it behind and those are things I inherit from my father.To create this page, I simply listed some of the differences, qualities and characteristics I see in my parents and that influence my personality. These are strange feelings and they bring me daily inner conflicts.

 

I hope they don’t feel offended by those things, because I didn’t mean it. My intention is reconciliation, make up for the lost and remaining time, for what it wasn’t said, to hurt and being hurt, for things that brought me any kind of feelings and for all the gratitude I have. From love!

 

After more than twenty days really struggling with this proposal, that’s what I did. That’s my perception. It’s the truth in my conception and I don’t think I need to hide it, because my parents, more than anybody else, they know how I am and who I am.

 

I saw my parents changing throughout the years. They aren’t the same people who brought me up. They’ve changed so much! They’re tender and their gestures and words are more loving nowadays. And I’m still the same, untouched, like the girl I was fifteen years ago, to whom something was denied.

 

I’m not blaming anybody. Well, I’m the one to be blamed.

 

That’s it, I’m feeling guilty because I’ve done that layout with some hard words, because I’m not able to give my parents they’re offering me, because I’m resentful, for being so selfish, because I can’t see that isolated events don’t change things.

 

Well, so many beautiful memories! Memories of a totally correct family life, of an education full of right concepts, so why do I remember my sorrows more than anything else? Ah, there are lots and lots of reflections!

 

And that’s really makes me feel good. It’s therapy through Art that set me free!I made this lo and I also reminded all the good things in me that came from my parents, I made this lo and I’m fine. I’ve recovered from that day, in the car, that you denied to say you loved me, even if I had cried begging you…even if she had asked you to say.

 

Your lips were sealed. There was no love. There was no father not even a mother for you. He wasn’t lucky as I was!

 

I made this page because I am what I am, a bit of you, a bit of me, with all my strictness, but, above all, I made this page to say I LOVE YOU!

 

In Portugese:

A minha é uma relação cheia de conflitos, contrastes e traumas. É uma relação de amor com toda sua ambiguidade. Sinto os sentimentos e caracterísiticas deles dentro de mim. Todos os dias.

 

Me olho no espelho, vejo os olhos de minha mãe.

 

Desconfio das pessoas, guardo um gesto. Contenho alguma emoção e sinto meu pai em mim. Não consigo errar, não consigo deixar de cumprir uma obrigação, um prazo, e sei que ele está ali.

 

Para compor essa página, eu simplesmente listei algumas das diferenças, qualidades e características que vejo neles e que formam o meu ser. São sentimentos ambíguos, que me geram conflitos internos diários.

 

Eu espero que eles não se ofendam com isto, não era, em nenhum momento, minha intenção. Minha intenção é de conciliação, de resgate do tempo que nos resta, daquilo que não se disse, daquilo que magoou, daquilo que emocionou, daquilo que gera gratidão. Do amor.

 

Mas, depois de vinte dias ou mais lutando de verdade com essa proposta, foi o que saiu. E é a minha percepção. É verdade na minha concepção e não acho que precise escondê-la, pois meus pais, mais do que ninguém, sabem como sou e quem sou.

 

Eu vi meus pais mudarem ao longo dos tempos. Eles não são mais as mesmas pessoas que me educaram. Mudaram tanto! São ternos e me dirigem os gestos e as palavras mais amorosas hoje. E eu permaneço lá, dura como uma pedra, como uma menina há quinze anos atrás, a quem foi negado algo.

 

Não estou culpando ninguém. Ou, melhor, estou culpando a mim mesma.

 

É isso, estou me sentindo culpada por ter feito essa página com algumas palavras duras, por não conseguir retribuir, por ser rancorosa, por ser egoísta, por não conseguir perceber que não são alguns eventos isolados que mudam as coisas.

 

Pois é, tantas lembranças lindas, de uma vida em família totalmente correta, de uma educação cheia de conceitos corretos, porque é que eu lembro mais de minhas mágoas?

 

Ah, são tantas reflexões!

 

E como isso faz bem! É a terapia pela arte que liberta!

 

Fiz essa página e lembrei também de tudo de bom que há em mim e que veio de meus pais, fiz essa página e estou curada daqule dia, no carro, em que você negou-se a dizer que me amava, mesmo que eu tenha chorado implorando…. mesmo que ela tenha pedido p/ você dizer.

 

Você calou. Não teve amor. Não teve pai nem mãe. Não teve a sorte que tive!

 

Fiz essa página porque sou assim, meio vocês, meio eu mesma, com toda minha rigidez, mas, acima de tudo, fiz essa página para dizer que AMO VOCÊS!

 

 


Dina:

 

Dina Says:

I have wonderful parents–creative, intelligent, dedicated–and this piece celebrates them. It’s also an homage to my mother, who is a brilliant seamstress & quilter. I have a nice relationship with them, just wish we lived much closer so we could see & enjoy them more often.

 

 


Karen:

Journaling Reads:

I have been blessed with the most amazing parents. I must admit that I have not always been actively aware of this fact. As a child, I spent most of my time wondering how I ended up in this family where I felt like I obviously didn’t belong. It’s not that they were bad people, it’s just that they were so very different than I was. They had different priorities and ideas of fun than I did. So I did a lot of sulking, a lot of doing my own thing and taking these amazing parents for granted. Yet, they never gave up on me and supported all my crazy and far-fetched dreams. When I told them I wanted to study in the United States, they did every single thing in their power to make it happen for me. Even though they don’t really understand what I do and sometimes they aren’t sure why I make the choices I make, they are always 100% behind me and they are first to cheer me on. When I falter, they are the first to rush in an help me. I’ve always known that my parents were supportive but it’s only in the last few years that I’ve come to full appreciate them..

 

 


Amy:

Amy Says:

My relationship with my mother continues to grow and evolve. As each of us changes, moving into different phases of our lives and facing different joys and heartbreaks and hopes and dreams, I’ve come to realize again and again the depth of the ties that bind us. Always she has been there for me. The quilt in this chair is one I made for her last year. Though this sketch is in black and white, the quilt is in her colors — so very different from my own. This quilt is a rich blending of turquoise and lime and black and white, colors that are at once alive and bright and playful even as they are calm and soothing.

 

 


Carole:

 

Carole Says:

I was such a lucky girl I had a wonderful time when I was young and my parents were amazing, I experienced some gorgeous countries and unusual places, and mum and dad where always there for me, and now that I am married I have gained wonderful in-laws as well.

 

 


Karola:

 

Karola Says:

When I was a child my life was not so easy – I had a lot of responsibilities, sometimes too difficult for a child, but it has fared. But my parents loved me and takes care of, they gave me a lot of freedom and confidence. I could do everything, but I could not betray that trust in every sphere of life, I tried not to disappoint them – at school, in relationships with family and other people. They taught me a deep respect for elders. After my parents divorced and our family broke up into million small pieces. Nothing was the same, even my relationship with my parents. At this moment I am in touch only with my Dad and I appreciate fact that after all these years he is still the same, loving and supporting me.

 

 


Shelley:

 

Shelley Says:

My relationship with my parents has been a happy and strong one. We have had our ups and downs as any family does but I have such great respect and love for my parents. They were there when I was divorced with three small children. They were there when my son was diagnosed with Autism and my baby was diagnosed with a rare bowel disease in the same month. They were there for surgeries, for birthdays, for holidays, and just because! They have been my rock of support and at times my life line. My trips to visit them when I felt totally alone and overwhelmed meant more than they will ever know. They have instilled in me my core beliefs that guide me in my daily life. Their love is unconditional and never ending. The last four Summers we have enjoyed and made some incredible memories on our two week vacations together with the kids. I could not have asked for better role models for parents. They are the best people I know.

 

 


Wendela:

 

Wendela Says:

My relationship with my parents is very good!! I think it become much better when I had my kids. My mother said they looks like you! Enjoy your kids as much as you can, time flies what we all know!!

 

 


Anna:

 

Anna Says:

I’m the lucky girl, who really had good, loving relationsip with both of my parents – and I still have. I’ve always respected them much and – on the other hand I wanted them to be proud with me, which wasn’t so easy;) I think they did their best to keep me safe and to be my best friends – and I love them so much.

 

 


Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “How was/is your relationship with your parents?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work so we can share in your creative therapy, too. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 




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