creative Therapy


Catalyst One Hundred and Two
February 24, 2010, 8:00 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number one hundred and two:

 

What was the worst thing you ever did?

 

We’re excited to have Kara Haupt as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a quickie self-bio for Kara:

 

My name is Kara Haupt. I’m 17 years old and a Senior in high school. I live with my family in the Northwest United States. I’m planning on going to art school this coming Fall and pursuing a career as a photographer. I spend most of time with my friends and making lists about all the things I should be doing.

 

If you’ve never seen Kara’s art, make sure to visit her blog. You can also buy some of her awesome journals, workshops and art from etsy shop.

 

 

 

 

Here is Kara’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and more detail.

 

 

 

Kara Says:

Out of the list of catalysts I was provided, this was the hardest for me. I had no idea what to do it on. I didn’t even know what I was going to say when I sat down to create. I kept having ideas running through my head, “can’t say that…”, “no way am i sharing that…”. I came to decide on this. The thing I am most ashamed of… I haven’t ever had the best relationship with God and I decided to confess that here. It felt like a Post Secret and I liked that. I encouraged you to try the same thing too.

 

Technique Highlight:

I would say my style is rather simple. I like to use cheap supplies I have on hand. I’ve been really into using pencil for journaling and I used a thick watercolor paper to create on. I handstiched on a cut-out picture from a Toast catalog and layered everything over scrapbooking patterned papers. I swirled some Gesso in the center and dropped sequins on when it was still wet.

 

 

Thank you so much Kara; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Iris:

 

Iris Says:

The worst thing I ever did was when I considered giving up my own personal style of creating pages and projects in favor of what people seemed to accept. Being the subject of criticism had its toll on my creativity but I soon realized that I started scrapbooking because it made me happy, and so I should continue creating pages for reasons that make me happy. Now I am less afraid of trying different things. I may not always be happy with the outcome but at least I have enjoyed the process.

 

The quote on the cover of the booklet reads: “life isnt about finding yourself, it is about creating yourself.

 

 


Lori:

 

Journaling Reads:

The worst thing I have ever done is lie to a friend. She was my best friend and I hurt her and that ended our relationship. It was a harsh lesson to learn. I spent many years after working on my self esteem and changing things that needed changing. I’m overly honest as a result. That lie is still my biggest regret.

 

 


Severine:

Severine Says:

When I was little, good manners were very important and was a big part in my education and angry my parents, I amused myself by not respecting these rules.

 

In French:

Quand j’étais petite, les bonnes manières étaient très importante et avait une grande part dans mon éducation et pour mettre en colère mes parents, je m’amusais à ne plus respecter ces règles.

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

I spent quite a lot of time thinking about this one. In the end, besides lying to a good friend years ago (which I already created a catalyst around), I couldn’t think of something big. I’ve done many many small but bad things in my life. I’m sure I’ve hurt people and lied and made them feel bad. But I can honestly say that none of it was maliciously done. I don’t ever try to hurt someone knowingly. I’ve been hurt a lot in my life so I work hard to be a good person and not hurt others.

 

 


Dina:

 

Dina Says:

You know, the worst thing I ever did is buried in a deep place, and I don’t think of it very often. I’ve moved so far from where I was at that point that it seems like a different person did it entirely. And frankly, I like to keep it that way. No sense dwelling on past mistakes, what’s done is done. This art journal page is about that…about how I’ve moved on.

 

 


Larissa:

 

Larissa Says:

I have a remorse hunting me and that is remembering the way I ended my past relationship because my former partner was way too weakened by the loss of his father, job and going through depression. I already knew a long time ago I wanted that relationship to come to an end but, the series of disasters and unhappy moments hindered me from doing it. Finally, I couldn’t take it anymore and when I found myself totally in love with my current husband, I abruptly ended up giving my ex the news.

 

I added everything to this poem:

You were vulnerable

Nude.

I went on…

Screwed you up

Ended our 5-year relationship

And I left you on total desperation

 

What does the death tarot card mean?

 

“Although we only expirience one physical death in this life, we experience thousands of other sorts of deaths during our life. Life, as we know, is a cycle, and death is part of that cycle. Phases of our life end, others begin. Relationships bloom, flourish, and sometimes die. What we belie changes and passes away as we grow spiritually. And we know taht where there is death, there is birth; where there is darkness, there is also light.

 

Our experiences have shown us that regardeless of the light following darkness, the darkness is still hard to live through. (…) growth, including spiritual growth, comes at great cost. To face it, to move through it, and to experience the birth of new life requires courage and strength.” – (A Guide to mystic faerie tarot, Barbara Moore)

 

 


Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What was the worst thing you ever did?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work so we can share in your creative therapy, too. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst One Hundred and One
February 17, 2010, 8:00 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number one hundred and one:

 

What was your childhood like?

 

We’re excited to have Mati Rose as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a quickie self-bio for Mati:

 

Mati Rose McDonough is a San Francisco based artist and illustrator who grew up off the coast of Maine. Mati draws from the inspiration on both east and west coast lines like her pirate namesake. She is both treasure seeker and explorer in her art making, hoping to retain childlike wonder in her discoveries and re-invent color compositions.

 

Mati has had numerous shows and illustrations published in books, magazines and her own designs. On a daily basis Mati can be found painting in her studio behind her home in the sunny Mission district shared with other artists.

 

If you’ve never seen Mati’s art, make sure to visit her blog and her beautiful site. You can also buy some of her amazing art from etsy shop.

 

 

photo by Thea Coughlin

 

 

Here is Mati’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and more detail.

 

 

 

Mati Says:

I believe I was a quiet, imaginative, dreamer of a child who always making forts, drew and cut up a lot of my mom’s socks to make puppets! I lost my biological dad who was an artist at 1.5 years old, so I think I made art as an escape from sadness and to connect to my artist father. In this painting I tap into that early imaginative state by transforming doilies into elephants and making circus forts and boats with rhinos! At age 7 my mom re-married my wonderful step-father and I gained a step-sister (my very same age) and we got into heaps of mischief together and balanced each other well!

 

 

Thank you so much Mati; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Amy:

 

Amy Says:

I have very few memories of my childhood. It is something that has always bothered me. As a young adult, I associated an “age” with my lack of memories. “I don’t remember anything before the age of ‘x’,” I would say. As I got older, I realized that while there may, indeed, be a line of demarcation, the “x” became more and more fluid with each passing year. In reality and in totality, I seem to remember very little. As a parent, I know how hard that is for my mother. I watch my own children and am often surprised by things they already don’t remember, things that seemed so important in this or that of their early years. For this piece, I pulled out a quilt my mother made for me when I was young. The quilt, salvaged from my childhood clothes (many of which I know my mother sewed) has always been special and symbolic to me. When I got the quilt out of storage to draw this piece, I was shocked to find it is wearing thin in places and that there are edges which have completely given way. The passage of time is clear. And, again, I was surprised by the colors in this quilt. I grew up in the 70s, and I guess this quilt is perfectly 70’s with its shades of blues and browns and its yellow binding. Drawing it in black and white allowed me to focus on the feel of the quilt, the patterning, the wedges, the simplicity, and the lines of the child’s rocking chair over which it is draped. There is a fitting quietness to this piece that grew as I worked. Somehow, in this quilt, there are memories and many years locked away.

 

 


Katie:

 

Katie Says:

Happy. I really would have to say that my childhood was pretty happy. My Mom was Supermom and made homemade playdough, baked cookies and helped us to make lemonade stands. I spent my early childhood in Florida, Idaho and California and have many different and happy memories of all 3 places. There are days when I just want to wrap myself up in those memories. I created this banner as a reminder of a simple and happy time. Everyone should have happy childhood memories.

 

 


Severine:

Severine Says:

My childhood was a childhood of magic, magical, a paradise filled with love and beautiful things.

 

In French:

Mon enfance a été une enfance magique, féerique, un paradis rempli d’amour et de jolies choses.

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

While I had a wonderful family who loved me very much, I was always a shy and lonely kid. I remember feeling lonely and sad. I didn’t have a lot of friends who liked me. I didn’t like them much either but at the time all that seemed to matter was that they didn’t like me. I am guessing that’s why I turned to books. Books were my salvation. All these years later, they still are. Though now, I know that I am happy and know that even as a kid, I had many more happy memories than most people.

 

 


Lori:

 

Lori Says:

I don’t have a lot of memories of my childhood, but what I do have I recall fondly. Mostly, I have an overall sense of happiness and joy regarding my upbringing.

 

Journaling Reads:

I have fond memories of my childhood. My Mom stayed home with us and she was always there if we needed her. I mostly remember feeling happy.

 

 


Lia:

 

Lia Says:

Being the youngest child meant that I always had my way, always being bullied, loved immensely by all and spoilt to the max! :) But it meant learning how to be kind, compassionate, a good person and play fair. My childhood was the best!!

 

 


Dina:

Dina Says:

I had a great childhood. I grew up in a loving home with creative, intelligent parents and siblings. Did we always all get along? Well, no. But we always loved each other. My journaling on this art journal page is about some of the memories I have…weeding the garden and eating delicious home-grown veggies, traveling all over the US and the world, learning to cook and work, and being encouraged to be independent.

 

 


Christine:

Christine Says:

As a child, I didn’t have very many toys and games, but the ones that our family had were well loved and played often. Since my brother and I spent a lot of time together after school, once we finished our homework, we would either choose to play outside with our neighbors or stay indoors and play games together. Outdoor fun consisted of roller skating or bike riding around the block, playing tag, and racing with our friends.

 

On days when the weather didn’t permit us to play outside, I remember spending hours playing Chinese checkers, all sorts of card games, building things with our Tinker Toys set and even playing marbles on the carpet! Computers were not available then so we were left to our imaginations and often made up our own games to play. What fun we had! I think about those times very fondly, and although we didn’t have much, we simply enjoyed them to the fullest!

 

 


Opal:

Opal Says:

I was raised in a quiet home. My parents believed firmly in the adage that “children should be seen and not heard.” Thankfully I lived in a neighborhood of post-war tract homes with families with kids, and the kids all about the same age. I kicked the ball, ran the bases, and played hide-and-go seek with my friends until dinner time at 5 p.m. sharp! The public library in town was my most favorite place. I would walk there alone (no, there was no snow and I had shoes!) or, when I was older, I rode my bike. As I climbed the cement steps to the Gothic revival domed free standing building, my return books clutched under my arm, I walked into my make believe world. Even today, right now, I can close my eyes and smell that space. I loved the smell of the books (and still do). I loved the stained glass arched windows and the quiet hush of bustled activity. I loved pulling out the little oak drawers of the card catalog, countless cards with names of authors, titles, and subjects, neatly typed and in alphabetical order. Down the stairs there was the periodical room full of magazines of every sort. I’d walk the aisles and scan the shelves, pulling out as many books and magazines as was allowed. I’d find my favorite window seat, (I remember there was a red rose in the stained glass window) and read for hours. I read the Nancy Drew Mysteries straight through, and then every fairy tale collection I could find. I read all the volumes of Raggedy Ann and Wizard of Oz. I read “how to” books, and studied books about the body. I loved looking at the large Webster’s dictionary that sat on top of a pedestal, open to a page full of words to be read. It stood beside the check-out desk. I read anything that caught my fancy, and I learned much on my own. I read as I walked home. And no doubt, there would be a kick ball game happening in the street, and for the moment, my books would be forgotten.

 

My piece is a loose rendering of my library. The circles are the colors of glass in those amazing windows, The space inside is stuffed with books made from words cut from fabric selvages. The sun is made from remnant strips of that circle fabric, the quilting providing the rays of the sun. The little blue flower in the lower right is a bit of my mom’s embroidery work. There is much machine quilting, and a good amount of hand stitching.

 

 


Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What was your childhood like?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work so we can share in your creative therapy, too. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst One Hundred
February 10, 2010, 8:00 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number one hundred:

 

What’s the highlight of your week?

 

We’re excited to have Teresa McFayden as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a quickie self-bio for Teresa:

 

I am a mixed media working artist. The Founder of Paper Bella Studio, Silver Bella, and original Founder of Foof a La. I am a child of God, a wife, a mother, a daughter, a sister, a friend, an artist, a designer, an entrepreneur, a photography novice, a free thinker, a cat and dog lover, a dream come true maker, a coffee drinker, a consumer, a recycler, a blogger, and a believer. Always a believer.

 

If you’ve never seen Teresa’s art, make sure to visit her blog and her beautiful site.

 

 

 

 

Here is Teresa’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and more detail.

 

 

 

Teresa Says:

One of the biggest highlights of my week comes on Friday mornings via text on my cell phone. My daughter, a freshman in college now, sends me a photo of her art class projects before she turns them in for critiquing. Most of them are so amazing. I look at them throughout the day and all I can do is smile! Having your baby grow up and leave for college sorta snuck on on me this Summer, and I relish every opportunity to connect with her while she’s away. Connecting through art is so fulfilling. It just doesn’t get much better than that.

 

 

Technique Highlight:

I freehand embroidered quote attached to a Chatterbox (I think) book display stand. I love these stands because you can hang any piece of your artwork on them with 2 round binding clips (7 Gypsies). For the past year and a half or so, I’ve been exploring free hand embroidery. It’s so relaxing! I don’t rush any of it and just do a little at a time each day. Usually 20 minutes or so. After I stitch the piece on linen, I add small embellishments and sew a backing to it. This one measures about 11×14.

 

 

Thank you so much Teresa; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Kimmi:

 

Kimmi Says:

My most favorite part of the week is a Monday afternoon. The weekend is over. We sleep late, enjoy lunch and the two of us have lots of fun time. We play and laugh and enjoy the house being empty. We stay in our “jommas” all day long and often treat ourselves to Sonic or Starbucks. Its our day for ‘us time’.

 

The weekends around our house are usually pretty hectic. There’s always something going on.. whether its a birthday, holiday, family event or some other sort of occasion, the weekends are usually more stressful and active than enjoyable. Me and Bray enjoy our afternoons the most. Mondays in particular. Its our day to relax and re-cooperate from our weekends.

 

 


Rachel:

 

Rachel Says:

The highlight of my week is one that I am lucky enough to have nearly every day… that calm and peace and love I feel each time Drew walks through the door after a day at work. He works so that I can spend my days raising and caring for our daughter and when he gets home I feel so grateful, so full of love and appreciation and a feeling of being utterly complete. Nothing beats hearing him walk up those steps and put his key in the door knob… I grin from ear to ear like a giddy school girl, so glad that he is finally home. It’s pure joy for me and truly the highlight of my week, every day that it happens.

 

Technique Highlight:

Using cardstock to mat my photo and hinges I created a door on my layout in which to include the journaling behind. Since hearing that door open is such a highlight of my week, I wanted to recreate that on my layout.

 

 


Severine:

Severine Says:

The best moment of my week happens on weekends, because that means more time with my family more time to do things together, more time to enjoy them.

 

In French:

Le meilleur moment de ma semaine c’est quand arrive le week-end, parce que ça veut dire plus de temps avec ma famille, plus de temps pour faire des choses ensemble, plus de temps pour profiter d’eux un maximum.

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

My days are all pretty much the same and I love that. I look forward to so many things each day. Time with my family and time alone and time to read and time to create and even time to work. I am very lucky that I get a little bit of each of these every single day. I don’t think there’s anything more I can ask from life.

 

 


Wilna:

 

Wilna Says:

This past week the highLIGHT was Kayla Aimee and my website that saw the light. It’s just a happy place for creative souls and collaborations. I made this page to celebrate this big event in our lifes. Yes, this little light of mine, i will let it shine!

 

Technique Highlight:

I just made little holes around the perimeter of the yellow paint and inserted battery operated lights from the back.

 

 


Lia:

 

Lia Says:

Sundays are probably my favorite day of the week. I do not need to rush anywhere, I can decide if I want to sleep in for a little bit, when and how long I should stay at the gym, family time is plentiful, I have lots of opportunities to destash my space and my mind … and best of all, the day usually ends with a date with bf. I usually dread it as Sunday comes to an end (which means a working week is fast approaching) but when I reflect on how full my Sundays are, I feel so blessed.

 

 


Wendela:

Wendela Says:

I’m a member of gospel choir “Desire, and every Monday we come together for singing! Sometimes we have a concert in a Church. I so love to do that, singing about the Lord, it’s a real highlight of the week!!

 

Technique Highlight:

My background is a paper of an old newspaper… Smeared some gesso on it, and use some watercolor paint, and some crackle paint. The picture from my choir was an article in a newspaper, so I cut it out and sewed it on this paper background. When all is dried, I embellished it with wood and some flowers and fabric.

 

 


Iris:

Iris Says:

I always look forward to my weekend trips to the street market near our house where I get to find vintage goods at really low prices. This project makes use of an old glass jar that I bought during one of my weekend trips. I covered it with alcohol inks. I also stamped and embossed on it. The flower is from Prima and I dressed it up with some twigs and beads which I also bought in the market.

 

 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What’s the highlight of your week?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work so we can share in your creative therapy, too. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst Ninety-Nine
February 3, 2010, 8:00 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number ninety-nine:

 

What’s something you wish you knew about your parents?

 

We’re excited to have Genevieve Simmonds as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a quickie self-bio for Genevieve:

 

Genevieve (aka Gen aka Paperjax aka G love aka Benny….) is a 32 year old mama and wife living in Vancouver BC. Proud to be taking care of her two boys, she relies heavily on creative release, bubble baths and happy hour. Gen is a published co-author of the Memory Makers release “We Dare You: Scrapbook Challenges About Real Life” (2007) and is still a member of the online challenge site http://www.efferdares.com. She has had artwork included in several different Publishers’ releases and designed a line of paper and stamps. Gen has a not-totally-abandoned blog and is in the process of setting up websites for her freelance graphic design/creative solutions business and mixed-media artwork. Keep up with her daily mumblings and musings via Twitter: ‘gensimmonds’.

 

If you’ve never seen Genevieve’s art, make sure to visit her blog and the dares blog.

 

 

 

 

Here is Genevieve’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and more detail.

 

 

 

Genevieve Says:

My parents publicly (within the family that is) began having problems after Christmas a few years ago. They had been together for almost 30 years and I felt as though I had been smacked in the face with Shock, a feeling that lasted some time. Over the years bits and pieces of truth and honesty and emotion and feeling have been discussed. We as a family made an effort to accept what was and vowed to work on communication.

 

I can see this now as a life lesson – where you learn it’s time to wake up and realize you’re an adult. Not just a daughter or little sister. So now I can have a grown-up legitimate opinion. And what about the life lesson where you learn how important communication is? I wish that was role-modelled for me instead of this after-the-fact ‘do as I say, not as I do’ idea.

 

What do I wish I knew about my parents? I wish I knew their stories. I wish that I had known more about them as individuals and as a couple. Who were you? Who are you? Where did you come from? Share your memories with me. What did you love? Who did you love? Where did you live? Why? For some reason there was an unspoken code of silence. There was lots of love, lots of opportunity, logic, responsibility, expectations, priviledge. But not much conversation. It’s clear now that not talking about problems and mistakes and feelings doesn’t make them go away.

 

Our stories are so important. When I began scrapbooking 8 years ago I fell in love with telling our story. Not just for other people but as a way to express myself and deal with topics both good and bad. I have used telling my story through photos and words and artwork as a creative and fundamental form of therapy. I believe that someone in the future will be interested in my personal legacy. I feel that all of our stories are unique and special and deserve to be told. One can never know what impact they may have.

 

I wish I had their stories. And there is still time….

 

Technique Highlight:

I prepared the background cardstock paper with a coat of gesso, applied with an old gift card. After the gesso, I used acrylic paints to bring out the texture in the paper and the gesso layer, as well as add colour to the background. This is an easy technique where you can’t really make a mistake…just incorporate it in!

 

The image of branches in the background was then transferred to the background with a blender pen and burnisher. It was a complete experiment and didn’t go quite as planned. Still, I’m never one to start over unless completely necessary, so I rubbed a bit more paint about and planned to cover up the part of the paper that had ripped (a fair-sized chunk) with the next step.

 

The photo was manipulated in Photoshop and printed onto canvas paper. One thing I love to do is incorporate interactivity and hidden surprise bits and/or journalling, extra texture and architecture. I cut the silhouette shape at the top of the image, trimmed down the sides and bottom and then cut it in half to create two doors of a ‘gate’.

 

I sewed hinges, added some rubons and more paint and a little heart.

 

 

Thank you so much Genevieve; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Dina:

 

Dina Says:

Years ago when I was trying to figure out if my husband was “the one,” I was really curious about my own parents’ courtship. I wanted to know how they fell in love and why they chose to get married…I wanted details! I wanted to hear about the butterflies! This page is about that wish…

 

 


Opal:

Opal Says:

If I could, I would like to ask my mom if she ever wanted to leave, to “fly the coop.” If she did, and she had good reasons to, we never knew. She kept things to herself. But looking back, I wonder what went through her head.

 

My piece is machine and hand quilted. The selvage piece at the bottom just appeared when I was looking for a black and white fabric. The name was perfect: “All Cooped Up.” My mom was a quilter, and she would have known the significance of the Flying Geese. I show her wistfully looking at them from her window, holding a bit of a dream in her beak.

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

I wish I knew you when you were kids. I wish I knew your dreams. What did you want to be when you grew up? What hopes did you have for the future? Did you wonder how your life was going to turn out? Were you happy? How I wish I knew you when you were little. How I wish we could have been friends then. I love you.

 

 


Lori:

 

Lori Says:

My Mom has always insisted she just wanted to be married well and raise children when she was younger. Times were very different for women in her day. Aspirations of careers were rare. Even still, I have always wondered what her dreams were when she was little. Maybe she’ll tell me one day when she’s ready.

 

Journaling Reads:

I have often wondered what you dreamed of being when you were young. Do you have any regrets? Would you go back and change anything? I have always assumed that the big dream was to be married and raise children because you told me so, but still, I wonder.

 

 


Lia:

 

Lia Says:

I wish I knew how my parents met and how they fell in love. What made them decide to be together, get married, and have us kids. But now that my mum has passed on, and I don’t want to make my dad sad by asking him too many questions about their relationship … I guess I’ll never have the full story. Dad tells me some snippets of their courtship and marriage once in a while, and I hold on to those morsels of information dearly.

 

 


Wendela:

Wendela Says:

I would love to know more about my roots! I don’t really know much about my parents because they are divorced…and they didn’t tell not much about that time…I love to know more about my mom and dad…because it’s about me…my roots…

 

 


Larissa:

Larissa Says:

I’d like to know their love story, how and why they fell in love. I would also like to know more about their childhood traumas so I can better understand the education I had.

 

 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What’s something you wish you knew about your parents?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work so we can share in your creative therapy, too. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 




Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 71 other followers