creative Therapy


Catalyst Ninety-Eight
January 27, 2010, 8:00 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number ninety-eight:

 

What does your future hold?

 

We’re excited to have Eileen Grobeck as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a quickie self-bio for Eileen:

 

Eileen was born and raised on Long Island, NY and lives there still. Her favorite quote is one by Marcel Proust that says, “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” She is primarily a self-taught mixed media/altered art artist, though she also dabbles in assemblage, art dolls, jewelry making and digital art and has been published in “Art Circus” and “The Faerie Zine, Vol 1 and Vol 2”, both by Lisa Kettel, and also in several ATC exhibitions (the most recent one was in France). She has been interviewed by Artella Words and Art.com, Circle Press.com, ACEO To Go.com and DIY City Magazine.com.

 

If you’ve never seen Eileen’s art, make sure to visit her Flickr account and her etsy shop and her beautiful blog.

 

 

 

 

Here is Eileen’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and more detail.

 

 

 

Eileen Says:

Before I begin I would like to say thank you, Karen, for inviting me to be a guest artist for Creative Therapy! I had not known of this blog before your invite but now, after spending a bit of time reading and absorbing, I find it to be an awesome source of inspiration. It’s such a privilege to gain a little insight into the hearts and minds of other kindred souls, many of whom I am familiar with and some of whom I am not, but all of whom I greatly admire.

 

So, what does my future hold? Now, this is a question that I have been asking myself an awful lot lately. Right now I’m standing at a major crossroads in my life – I have just retired (woot! happy dance!!!) and I am now facing the challenge and excitement of reinventing my life. Of course, this new life must center around a few important things – art, poetry and photography. These are my three creative loves, and they sustain and motivate me in ways I cannot explain. This new life must also have some new things – even though I have yet to find these new things. I don’t know exactly how or when they will manifest, but I believe that they will come into my life without having to search for them. They will be serendipitous, and they will have innocent starts but will take on a momentum that will shape and direct this new journey I am most anxious to begin. This is what I like to believe.

 

Of course, none of us knows what the future has in store for us. All we can do is lay the foundation for a clear path towards the direction in which we wish to travel, and this is what I will be focused on doing. There is an old Chinese proverb that says, “Keep a green bough in your heart and the singing bird will come,” and this will become my new mantra for creating a life that in the past I have only dreamed of. Now that I have the gift of time I plan to pursue my three loves with renewed fervor. I would love to see myself collaborating on new projects with my peers, and see more of my artwork and poetry published. I plan on attending more workshop retreats to continue learning new skills as well as stretch and perfect the ones I already have. I will also be developing a new artistic “voice” that incorporates my poetry and photography into my artwork. From time to time I have thought about forming an art center or collective and teaching, or maybe even publishing a book. And of course, and very importantly, I am looking forward to making lots of new art friends as well as nurturing those I have already made.

 

The artwork I have created for this weeks prompt is in many ways a self-portrait. It is a mixed media collage that centers around the theme of “journey,” because that is how I see my future. I have incorporated a lot of symbology that relates to my present situation that may not be apparent – the crowned bird for freedom (retirement), a checkered road that leads into the future; flowers growing along the road (each with an inspirational single word prompt as a guide); inspirational thoughts around the border of the artwork; a dragonfly for hope, change and love; a camera lens over her eyes to clarify her vision; question marks and blank puzzle pieces for the unknown; a green bough in her heart for hope; her joy in embracing the call to new things (the nest filled with unhatched eggs in her arms); colors rich and vibrant for her passion and excitement.

 

Technique Highlight:

I started with a well gessoed 12×18 140 lb cold press watercolor paper and created a multi-layered background using ephemera, watercolors, inks and acrylics, then added more layers of paint, gesso and ephemera until I was happy with how it looked. Then I added the girl and other key elements through collage, and did a small bit of journaling around the girl, the dragonfly and the sun. I purposely left parts of the canvas looking unfinished and empty because I don’t believe a work is ever truly “finished” and as I’ve said, none of us knows what our futures hold. The most we can do is hope and dream, and build clear paths as we journey towards our sought after goals.

 

 

Thank you so much Eileen; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team. We’re delighted to welcome Dina Wakely as one of our new team members this week!

 

Dina:

 

Dina Says:

My art journaling page reflects my hopes for the future….I wrote, “I hope the future holds love and art and adventure and joy…but I know the future will be what I make of it…I will make it great.” I know that good and bad things happen in life, things that we don’t have any control over. But I also know I do have control over how I react, over how I triumph. Bring it on! :)

 

 


Amy:

Amy Says:

What does the future hold? I don’t know. As I look ahead there is much uncertainty and much unknown. And yet in this drawing, based on a photo from a series my son took for me, I see layers of meaning and possibility. I see hope. I see nurturing and being nurtured. I see gentle.

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

When I thought of this catalyst the word that kept coming back to me over and over again was bliss. I am not sure why. But when I think of my life, the overwhelming sensation is bliss and gratitude. So at this point, while I know nothing about my future, all I feel is that it holds more bliss. May that be true.

 

 


Severine:

 

Severine Says:

My future is my family and what I see in their eyes.

 

In French:

Mon avenir tiens à ma famille et à ce que je vois dans leurs yeux.

 

 


Christine:

 

Chirstine Says:

As a Christian, I believe that the one desire that is expressed in Psalm 27:4 will be fulfilled in my future. I hang on to the hope that someday I will be able to be in the presence of God for the rest of my days, and that I will sing praises to Him forever.

 

Technique Highlight:

I used Photoshop to create the text of this verse and varied the opacity of different words (if you look closely, you can see some words in the script font that are faint next to the main body of the verse). The verse was printed on vellum and quickly embossed with clear embossing powder. The title and verse reference were also printed on vellum and embossed then hand cut. The title was cut closely to the letters and the verse reference was cut to fit inside of the nameplate.

 

 


Wilna:

Wilna Says:

This page is a prayer for my girl that’s turning 13 this year. I know it’s going to be a year full of changes for her, but i know we don’t’ have to fear a thing! My expectation is for good things!

 

 

 

Journaling Reads:

Dear Tia… This is your year! This year you will enter into your teenage years which will be a wonderful time for you. Expect only the best. Expect to start knowing yourself like never before. Expect to change! It;s OK! But most of all, expect to enter into a new and wonderful time with your Father. For after all, you belong to Him. My prayer is simple: Eph 1 1:3 Let’s celebrate God! Every spiritual blessing in heavenly places has found its definition in the fact that we are in Christ. 1:4 This association goes back to before the fall of the world, His love knew that He would present us again face to face before Him, identified in Christ in blameless innocence. 1:5 He is the architect of our design; His heart dream realized our coming of age in Christ. (See Gal.4:1-6 “…and to seal our sonship the spirit of His son echoes Abba Father in our hearts.”) 1:6 His grace-plan is to be celebrated: He greatly endeared us and highly favoured us in Christ; His love for His Son is His love for us. 1:7 Since we are (fully represented) in Him, His blood is the ransom that secures our redemption. His forgiving us our sins measures the wealth of His grace. 1:8 This grace shown towards us communicates a wisdom and discernment of our worth that completely surpasses any definition. 1:9 The secret is out! His cherished love-dream now unfolds in front of our very eyes. So dear girl… I know this year holds only good things for you. Love you very much! Wilna.


Wendela:

Wendela Says:

I made a calendar for this catalyst..I hope in the future never to forget the birthdays of my family..so I made this one, a birthday calendar!!

 

 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What does your future hold?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work so we can share in your creative therapy, too. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst Ninety-Seven
January 20, 2010, 6:43 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number ninety-seven:

 

When in life have you felt most alone?

 

We’re excited to have Dina Wakley as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a quickie self-bio for Dina:

 

I’m Dina…I live in hot, sunny AZ with my 3 boys and husband. I love absolutely everything about art! I stamp, scrapbook, do mixed media collage, and visual journaling.

 

Dina teaches amazing art journaling classes and If you’ve never seen her beautiful art, make sure to visit her blog.

 

 

 

 

Here is Dina’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and more detail.

 

 

 

Dina Says:

The time when I felt most alone was last March…I was teaching overseas and encountered some people who thought my art was pretty much ridiculous. After enduring their public scorn, I felt intensely alone. I was homesick (I had been gone 25 days) and I desperately missed my 3 boys and my husband. I felt so very far away from anyone who loved me–I was so anxious to return to them. When I got off the airplane in Phoenix, I assumed my family would pick me up at the curb like they usually do. But, as I walked out of the terminal, I saw my 3 boys and my husband waiting for me just past security, grinning from ear to ear. Being with them again was truly joyous!

 

Technique Highlight:

I love to use Portfolio Water Soluble Oil Pastels to highlight silhouettes in my work. I create the silhouette, and then I scribble some of the oil pastel around the perimeter. I use my finger to blend and spread the colors. The pastels are creamy and buttery, and are super easy to use.

 

 

Thank you so much Dina; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Rachel:

 

Journaling Reads:

Constantly inside my head… analyzing, wondering, doubting… to the point of isolation. I never feel more alone than when I am in a crowd, but I am constantly hoping and looking to not feel so alone in life..

 

 


Larissa:

Larissa Says:

I’ve always wanted a passionate life, dreaming of intensively living my fairy tale. My story, however, has its ups and downs and solitude moments. I felt lonely when I was not understood. I felt lonely when despised, resigning myself to waiting for better moments, for my fairy tale, for romanticism, for passion.

 

For this catalyst, I worked on a wire manequin with hoop in which I assembled a beautiful wedding dress, all ornamented with little birds, flowers and butterflies, representing the search for my fairy tale, for overcoming loneliness.

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

While there are also many good memories from that time, The beginning of Freshman year of college was a really hard time for me. I remember a day when I received a package of CDs from my mom. I put on “Little Jeannie” by Elton John and so many memories of home came back that I sat and wept. It was hard to be so far away from home, learning so many new cultural things along with educational ones. I made it through beautifully but there were a few rough months there at first.

 

 


Anita:

 

Anita Says:

I was so alone before I found my husband and had my children. They totally complete me! Could imagine my life without any of them.

 

Journaling Reads:

Alone? Before him, before children, before my life has been blessed, before I knew God, before all the things I have now. I am NOT alone anymore!

 

 


Severine:

 

Severine Says:

I always hated speaking in public. Each time, it is a great moment of loneliness for me, I prick a lighthouse, I can hardly speak, I have a stomach ache … in short a real torture, it’s only when I host a scrapbooking workshop that I can go over everything.

 

In French:

j’ai toujours eu horreur de prendre la parole en public, à chaque fois c’est un grand moment de solitude pour moi, je pique un phare, j’ai du mal à parler, j’ai mal au ventre …bref une vrai torture, il n’y a que quand j’anime un atelier de scrap que j’arrive à passer au dessus de tout ça.

 

 


Amy:

Amy Says:

I think often the times I feel most alone are the times in which I am surrounded by other people — routine moments where there are many people and many conversations going on over and above and around me. In those moments, I feel keenly how alone I am, how on the outside of things. Knitting is a good surface in these moments. My mind is in constant motion – a dialogue within – even as conversations swirl around me. Note: This piece went through several versions. The drawing was the core, but after finishing that, I wanted to add in all the conversation floating around me, but not quite reaching me. I did that digitally, but it seemed, in the end, that the drawing alone… stands alone.

 

 


Katie:

Katie Says:

The most alone I ever felt was in the middle of an afternoon in May, when I was 15. It was a traumatic day, one that I will never forget. The one thing that I kept focused on was a little patch of blue sky that was peeking out from between the thick branches that blocked the Virginia sky that day. I prayed over and over to God to help me but he didn’t answer my prayers. I felt so alone, so scared, so hurt. I just stared at that blue patch and prayed for it to all be over. I have recently been blogging about this event in my life after many years of silence. It felt so good. I did feel that day that God was not there for me. Not that day or many days after. But now that my story has been told and I can go back and re-read it, I see it in a different light. I see it totally differently.

 

For one, maybe God could not stop it. Maybe the forces of evil were too strong that day. Maybe God could only be there to help me get through it that day.

 

Or, maybe God did protect me. Maybe I was not ever meant to walk out of those woods. Maybe God was there helping me to survive.

 

I don’t know what purpose that day had or if there was any purpose at all. But today but I don’t believe that I was “alone” that day. Looking back, I know that God was there.

 

I started this project out with the intention of having a blue sky peeking out of some heavy branches and communicating the turmoil that I felt that day. But somehow the project turned peaceful and pretty even though the memory isn’t. Somehow some inner peace was found while creating this project. Something that was meant to communicate the fear and “alone” feeling ended up turning into a quiet and peaceful project. Maybe, finally that scary day is gone forever and in it’s place is God’s love.

 

Technique Highlight:

Hydrangea and Blue Maya Mist with white paint splatter covered with the 2 part Helmar Crackle Glaze. Then inked with Maya Road white pigment ink and gently wiped off with a damp rag so that the white ink filled in the cracks. The branches are inked brown, lines drawn with pen and then layered with the Helmar Textured Effects for an authentic branch texture. Leaves punched, line embossed, folded and inked.

 

 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “When in life have you felt most alone?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work so we can share in your creative therapy, too. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst Ninety-Six
January 13, 2010, 8:00 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number ninety-six:

 

What are the most important lessons you’ve learned in life?

 

We’re excited to have Merdrey Chew as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a quickie self-bio for Merdrey:

 

My dream came true about a month back when i was given the opportunity to be a full time scrapbooking teacher with my local scrapbooking store, PaperMarket! I love to see the scrappers’ wide smile when they complete their projects and it is so cool to see what i design bring joy to them!

 

If you’ve never seen Merdrey’s beautiful art, make sure to visit her blog.

 

 

 

 

Here is Merdrey’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and more detail.

 

 

 

Merdrey Says:

As i was thinking about the most important lesson i have learnt in life, i remembered once when my dad told me to listen…even if it is something that has been said many times. This, to me, is a simple and powerful reminder each day as we deal with the many distractions in life. But if you listen, you will hear the joy in the voices, saddness even in online chat messages and directions in life from God…so open your hearts, close your eyes and just LISTEN!

 

Technique Highlight:

I have discovered a love for gel medium recently and they work perfectly for my altered frame. Just apply the medium on the frame and on the storybook pages separately. Place the storybook page on the frame and cover the whole area with another layer of gel medium! Leave to dry. Claudine Hellmuth Studio multi medium in matte is what i love best! =)

 

 

Thank you so much Merdrey; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Rachel:

 

Rachel Says:

I live my life by three lessons that I have learned throughout the years. Some of these lessons I resented having to learn… being told that happiness is a choice when you are crying your eyes out because you are dissapointed yet again in someone or something stings and doesn’t feel like help at all. It’s maddening when you learn that yes, character isn’t always built, it is revealed and the revelation isn’t always a good one. When the last thing that you want to do is be kind to someone who is hurting you, to realize that it’s the first thing you should try is frustrating to say the least… but it is all a part of life, learning who we are and how to live.

 

Journaling Reads:

Happiness is a CHOICE. Tough times don’t build character they REVEAL it. Practice KINDNESS.

 

 


Christine:

Christine Says:

The most important lessons I’ve learned so far in my life has centered around things God has taught me. First, that I find hope in Him as a result of the redemptive work that He has done in me through the sacrifice of His Son, Jesus Christ. Because I now know and have experienced His abundant provision not only materially but spiritually, I can trust Him to continue to provide for all my needs at the moment and time that it’s needed. My hope rests in the Lord and His promises.

 

We wait in hope for the LORD;

he is our help and our shield.

 

In him our hearts rejoice,

for we trust in his holy name.

 

May your unfailing love rest upon us, O LORD,

even as we put our hope in you.

  – Psalm 33:20-22

 

The next lesson is something that I am continuing to learn and practice each day: the true meaning of love. It is not defined by the world’s standards, but by God’s standard. It is a glorious, unconditional, and sacrificial love that encompasses the nature of God. Because I have experienced the grace of God’s love, my heart is transformed and motivated by that love to act in faith and grace beyond what I would normally choose to do. It is a love that goes beyond the boundaries of giving…it is completely selfless. Although, in my flesh, it is a challenge to love in this way, God is faithful to remind me that I can do so as He graciously provides an abundance of that love to me to be shared with others.

 

The last lesson depicted in my project is peace. In the past, I have sought to find peace and fulfillment in so many things, yet they have always come up lacking in providing any lasting peace. When I hoped that someone’ acceptance of me would make me happy, they have let me down. When I thought that possessing an item would fill a need, I found that simply having it still left me with an empty feeling in my heart. Only when my mind and heart are focused on God and His graciousness do I begin to see clearly about what is needed for me to have peace…to focus, love, and fully trust in Him with my whole heart, soul, and strength.

 

Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on thee: because he trusteth in thee. Trust ye in the LORD for ever: for in the LORD JEHOVAH is everlasting strength: – Isaiah 26:3-4

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

I’ve decided that, in the end, all that matters is your integrity. Do you always do what you say you will by when you say you will? I strive to. And I strive to surround myself with people who do. Too many people discount the value of one’s word. All you have is your word. Does yours mean anything?

 

 


Lia:

 

Lia Says:

2009 was a year of many ups and a few downs for me and isn’t it normal for the downs to overshadow the ups, even in the initial stages? The downs last year made me doubt myself and I totally forgot the achievements I got. I wondered if I will ever recover from the setbacks and more importantly if I would ever regain my self-confidence. Then someone gave me a hug and told me that ‘everything will be OK’ … and I carried those words with me every day and I remember them each time I began doing something. I knew that no matter what people said or did to me, and no matter if I succeeded or failed … that life will create new opportunities for me, that life experiences are to be treasured and nothing can break me down. Those words gave me strength and I appreciated them through the toughest of times and the best of days. Thank you to you for your gift of words.

 

 


Wendela:

 

Wendela Says:

The most important lesson for me is “Trust in Him at all days” Psalm 62 verse 8

 

Technique Highlight:

I cut a piece of currogated cardboard in a heart shape, yes, I know, I love hearts… Than I paint with gesso on it, and added some tissue paper on it, and paint over it. The same with music paper sheets. Added some pearl beads for more texture. When all is dried, I sprayed it with glimmer mist, and write the Bible verse on it.

 

 


Opal:

Opal Says:

Follow your dream is one of many lessons I’ve learned in my life. As a child, my dream was to be a teacher. It took me many years to realize goal, but I never gave up. When my oldest child was graduating from high school, I went back to finish my undergraduate work and at the age of 40, I became a classroom teacher. I loved being in the classroom every single day of my career.

 

I pieced my bird using only scraps and bits of fabric that were on my work table from recent projects. Her many layers are embellished with threadplay and quilting done on my machine. I love her stance as she steps towards the goal of her dreams, and looks down at how far she has come.

 


Kimmi:

Kimmi Says:

“Lessons Learned” laugh. be happy and thankful for what you have. time passes quickly. capture it. the little things in life matter the most. a child can change your outlook on life. be what you want. not what others expect of you.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What are the most important lessons you’ve learned in life?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work so we can share in your creative therapy, too. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst Ninety-Five
January 6, 2010, 8:00 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

Welcome to the first catalyst of 2010! As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number ninety-five:

 

What’s something you struggle with?

 

We’re excited to have Cheryl Ametewee as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a quickie self-bio for Cheryl:

 

i’m just a very simple girl blessed enough to be living out my dream in the DC area…loving my new role as a stay-at-home wife to nathan, my african born husband of 5 months, and mama to london, the orneriest 1 year on the planet. we are also so excited about the little girl who will be joining our little family mid-march. i spend my days taking care of my family and immersing myself in colorful art that reflects the deep emotions i feel towards the people i care about, my passion for living and the way i deal with the good AND bad that life throws at me. i hope that one day my children and grandchildren will know their legacy and how very much they were loved through my words and art. and even if no-one else ever opens the pages of my albums, they will still always mean something to me because my artwork has given me an outlet to deal with so many things over the years that would have been so much harder without this creative escape.

 

If you’ve never seen Cheryl’s art, make sure to visit her 2peas gallery and her blog where she also has awesome challenges weekly!

 

 

 

 

Here is Cheryl’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and more detail.

 

 

 

Cheryl Says:

i decided to go with my struggle to do too much physically despite the chronic intense pain i deal with 24/7 (caused by an automobile accident when i was 17) because it has been my biggest struggle lately. and while in the journaling i talked about wishing i could do more going out, doing things for others and keeping up with friends, it extends to many other parts of my life as well. but i’m trying to take this new cheryl one step at a time. if i would have had more room, i could have probably written 5-10 pages on how hard this is for me and how much my husband has made me realize just in the 5 months we’ve been married that it’s ok to be different and just accept who i am and my own limitations. it actually helped so much to get this all in writing and i’m hoping that reading it in the future will be a good reminder to stay strong and not give in to my own pride and continue to pay for something that i can prevent by standing up for myself and my family.

 

 

Thank you so much Cheryl; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Rachel:

 

Journaling Reads:

I never feel at peace within myself… constantly thinking, wondering, worrying, doubting and analyzing every little thing to the point of near madness inside my own head. Outwardly I am usually pretty calm, quiet and by all appearances, peaceful person, but that is rarely the case on the inside. It’s my daily, sometimes minute-ly struggle… to find my peace.

 

Technique Highlight:

To create some custom peace sign elements to my page, I used a reverse applique technique using pattern paper. I sketched and cut away the negative elements in the peace signs and sticthed around them. This technique is seen often on clothing and other household decorative elements so I wanted to try to incorporate it into my piece this week.

 

 


Severine:

Severine Says:

I constantly struggle against my weight to try to keep it stable, which is not easy for me, and chocolate is my worst enemy in this struggle.

 

In French:

Je lutte constamment contre mon poids pour essayer de le maintenir stable, ce qui n’est pas chose facile pour moi, et le chocolat est mon pire ennemi dans cette lutte.

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

I made a list of all the things I would like to do. I constantly struggle with choosing which thing to do, to learn. I want them all. I made a list and printed it as my background.

 

Here’s what’s in the list: Teach David how to read. Learn Russian. Get a PhD. Study Mathematics. Learn to sew. Learn to crochet. Drive fearlessly. Visit Antarctica. Ride on a hot air ballon. Write a novel. Write another novel. Learn to ballroom dance. Learn to draw. Really well. Play the saxophone. Read. read. read. a lot. Learn Hebrew. Visit New Zealand, Australia, and Africa. Pet a penguin. Master web design. Teach Nathaniel to read. Teach both my kids math. Spend oodles of family time together laughing and hugging and playing. See the Northern Lights in Alaska. Drive across the country again. See all of the states. Go camping. Write a product that I am really proud of and one that becomes popular. Learn to quilt and make a huge quilt for our bed. Get my coaching license. Learn to ride a bike. Make beautiful art journals. Teach courses. Let go. Journal every day. Run a marathon. Cook more and better. Start my own non-profit. Run a non-profit bookstore. Embrace imperfection. Publish a book with my photography. Take a lot more photographs. Master post-processing. Master photography. Become fluent in Japanese, Italian and French. And Sign Language. Go to an art retreat. Let go. Stop seeking validation. Embrace joy. Make a movie. Create art products. Affect the education system. Let go. Learn to paint. Acrylic. Oil. Learn wood carving and metal smithing. Learn more about physics. Chemistry. Statistics. Become a therapist. Learn to decorate a cake. Master design principles. Have a photo shoot with my family. Read all the classics. Go to the movies. Take daily photos. Make more scrapbook pages. Tell our stories. Tell my parents’ stories. Tell my grandparents’ stories. Collect family photos. Find my own style. Let go. Embrace myself and the way I look. Make lifelong friends. Spend regular time with good friends. Apologize from people I’ve hurt. Donate to charity. Volunteer. Learn to knit in the round and to knit a cable. Change a tire. Make wreaths. Make bread. Take photos of myself everyday for a year. Reach out to family more and connect. Take a trip alone. Watch the sun rise and the sun set on the same day. Bake a pie. Let go. Make a really complicated dish. Walk across the Brooklyn bridge and the Golden Gate bridge. Declutter. Practice kindness towards others and myself. Let go.

 

 


Lori:

Lori Says:

My biggest struggle is with time. I tend to underestimate how much time I need and end up without enough. I’m learning to say “no” and to manage my time better these days, but it is still a constant struggle for me.

 

Journaling Reads:

I struggle with time. I always think I have more of it than I really do. Before I know it I’ve run out of time.

 

 


Larissa:

 

Larissa Says:

I have two difficult steps to take. I struggle.I know I need to get it done. I know it´s not over until I overcome these obstacles.

 

 


Opal:

Opal Says:

My struggle is with time….there is never enough … it is elusive … and it never stops. I wish I could savor and enjoy the moments, and hold them in my hands for just a bit longer. The fish in my piece seems to be gasping for time….and not quite getting it. Machine quilted with gold thread.

 


Kimmi:

Kimmi Says:

I’ve constantly struggled with acceptance. I’ve always felt like I didn’t fit in… that I didn’t belong.. not anywhere. I tired to find my place, but it always felt wrong. After graduating high school, going through a difficult divorce, and having a child, I’ve learned that it’s okay to stop trying. It’s okay to not fit in. It’s okay to not be someone that others expect of you. I’m a much happier person now that I can be who I want to be.

 

 


Wendela:

 

Wendela Says:

TIME!! Time for my kids. Time for my husband. Time for my family. Time for reading my Bible. Time for praying. Time for friends. Time for cleaning my house. Time for my garden. Time for my work. Time for scrapbooking. Time for knitting and crocheting. Time for….But I always know….My time is in His Mighty Hands, Thank you Lord!!

 

Technique Highlight:

A little piece of a puzzle painted with paint and crackle medium….so lovely to do!

 

 


Wilna:

 

Wilna Says:

I have always struggled with my weight. It’s just always been those horrible 10 or 15 pounds. What amazes me of stories like the greatest loser, is that people can lose 100s of pounds and I struggle with 15. So, I made a decision this time to join weight watchers and start to lose the weight. I am so proud of myself for doing this and I hope that 2010 will be my butterfly year.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What’s something you struggle with?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work so we can share in your creative therapy, too. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 




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