creative Therapy


Catalyst Eighty-Five
October 25, 2009, 8:07 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number eighty-five:

 

What’s the most daring or scariest thing you’ve ever done?

 

We’re so excited to have Julie Prichard as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a short little bio for Julie: Julie Prichard lives in San Diego with her husband and three year old daughter. She can be found painting in her studio or on the streets of San Diego with her camera.

 

If you haven’t seen Julie’s art, make sure to visit her blog here she also has information about the online workshops she teaches.

 

 

 

 

Here is Julie’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version.

 

 

 

Julie Says:

I am the type of person where fears frequently take hold of my thinking. There are several fears that can ground me at any given moment and I have carved them into wood for this week¹s catalyst. Always in deliberation, it is tough for me to address one, single, scary moment. It didn’t take long to fill up this panel.

 

Technique Highlight:

I use only a few colors of paint for most of my artwork. This piece was created using two reds, black and titan buff paint. Once painted, I added beeswax to the piece and then used a wood-burning tool to carve the lettering. To darken up the wood when I was finished, I used a black glaze buffed into the piece.

 

 

Thank you so much Julie; we’re so very very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Opal:

Opal Says:

I am not one who takes dares…or ventures beyond her comfort level. Thinking about this prompt took me back to my college days. From my first look through the class schedule handbook, I knew that public speaking was something that I would have to face…sooner or later. Being painfully shy in those days, the thought of getting up in front of a class and speaking just about sent me running for the hills…I put it off…and pushed it back…and overlooked it….until 20 years later when i finally finished my undergraduate degree. I will never forget the meeting with my counselor…and the realization that I had this one class..a freshman level class…to take before I could graduate. I went to that first class of Speech 101 with clammy palms and a pounding heart. The day came when I stood up in front of that class….again with clammy palms and a pounding heart. I remember taking a deep breath…and praying that I wouldn’t forget what I had practiced…and I started talking…tentatively at first…and then, 8 minutes later. I had found the magic. I love the moment when the audience quiets, the hushing and settling is tangible as a breath is taken…and the words become.

 

This piece is done in layers of fabric. The circles within the squares shows the essence of an audience…one you see with no defined details…the stage in front showcases the bigger than life microphone. hand and machine quilted.

 

 


Larissa:

Larissa Says:

When I was about 12 years old, I took the blame for something I hadn’t done without knowing the consequences. I remember being in the classroom at school when one of my classmates threw a piece of chalk at the teacher. She got furious, immediately interrupted the class, and said she wouldn’t continue the class unless the guilty one admitted or someone picked the chalk up from the floor. After a long period of silence without anyone declaring themselves guilty, I stood up and picked the piece of chalk up from the floor. I can still feel the terror I felt back then when I executed such gesture. I don´t know why I did this, I just couldn´t stand being there on that situation… I just´couldn´t stand such lack of respect for our theacher.. she was so upset, however, she didn’t punish me; she actually mentioned knowing it wasn’t me who threw the piece of chalk and lectured once again about the cowardice committed. The class, however, moved on…
My work for this catalyst plays with the idea of feeling fear, foolishness and horror… I worked with an amazing photo by R. Cadloff.

 

 


Wendela:

Wendela Says:

The most daring and scariest thing I ever did is ….. FLY like a bird….in an airplaine….!!!

 

Technique Highlight:

The beautiful bird is form a piece of Websters Pages patterned paper, The ribbons and laces, found this stuff on a fleamarke, and the wood, found it in the forest during a walk with my kids.

 

 


Karen:

Journaling Reads:

“Let’s just do it!” I said. We were sitting in Bar 89. Facing each other. Talking about how much we hated our jobs how sick we were of New York. How we wanted something different. “Let’s just quit and move!” I encouraged him. (and myself) I wanted to know that we still had the guts. That we owned our life, not them.

 

It took us another year but we finally did it. Quit the jobs. Packed the apartment. Bought a car. And moved 3,000 miles. To a city we’ve never seen before.
A city where we knew no one. Had no jobs.

 

We did it. We got jobs. Found a home. Started a life.

 

And, most importantly, proved we can do it.

 

We just did it.

 

 


Rachel:

 

Journaling Reads:

I fell in love with the boy… and he change my life and mended my broken heart. I had lost my faith in love, in men, in hope at the age of 14. I saw how fragile and frail that “love” could be and vowed to never, ever open myself to that. I was cold and I was cynical and I was afraid. I carried my fear and anger around me like armor to keep me safe. And then I met Drew, the boy from the music store and my fear and coldness melted away. It was scary. It was daring and bold, but it was my miracle. The cure to my broken heart… and I lept… closed my eyes, smiled and hoped that I would not fail and he caught me and has never let go.

 

Technique Highlight:

I created the flap that lifts up to house my journaling by tracing a portion of a shaped piece of paper onto a patterned paper and cutting it out. I used trim and brads to create hinges for it.

 

I also created a handmade flower out of sewing patterns by cutting a strip approximately 10″x3″ and folding it in half creating a piece that is 10″x1.5″. Using a needle and thread I used a running stitch and stitched the open edges and gathered, forming the strip into a circle. Tie off the loose thread and you have a custom flower. I used an inchie for the center, but you could use any embellishments that you may have lying around.

 

 


Dedra:

 

Dedra Says:

My ex-husband was very emotionally abusive. Shelby was just an infant and he would tell me on a daily basis how horrible I was as a mother and if I left I would not be able to survive.

 

I was 22 years old after hearing this everyday along with other things he said for some reason I started to believe him.

 

Shelby was 2 and I had decided that I COULD and WOULD make it without him. I wanted Shelby to see and experience a healthy, happy life.

 

I moved Shelby and I out into our own apartment while he was at work. It was the most nerve racking, nail biting experience. Knowing that he could show up at anytime.

 

I received a phone call later that evening, it was not nice to say the least. Hey! I left him the couch, TV and some pans I think. It was the most daring/scariest thing I had ever done, but it was THE BEST thing for Shelby and I. Where we are now seems light years away from that situation.

 

Journaling Reads:

Me and you, together on our own for awhile. being confident as a single mother. Believing in myself and not what I had been told. Spreading my wings and moving on.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What’s the most daring or scariest thing you’ve ever done?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work and you will qualify for the RAK we offer to a random participant. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst Eighty-Four
October 18, 2009, 6:40 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number eighty-four:

 

What’s the best gift you ever gave?

 

We’re so excited to have Lydie Manche as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Here’s a short little bio for Lydie: 29 years old, I am a wife and a mother of two little and terrible girls . We are living in a small village in the north east of France. I like this village very much because because it is edged with meadows and because houses full of flowers are made of old stones. Houses have soul, nature is present everywhere and all that contributes to my inspiration… I’ve scrapped since the birth of my first daughter and my scrap evolved little by little towards what they call in France the “plant scrap”.

 

If you haven’t seen Lydie’s art, make sure to visit her blog.

 

 

 

 

Here is Lydie’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version.

 

 

 

Lydie Says:

In our world, everything pushes us to consumption, to purchase… A PSP here, an i-pod thereabouts… a jewel, a computer, a television with flat screen… The society constructs its stocks on the idea of “having “.To illustrate this subject, I wanted to emphasize a simple but invaluable present: a present which everybody has but that can be sometimes forgotten: love. And what better to express love than a kiss? The kiss of two beings who like each other, the kiss of a parent on the forehead of her child, a kiss on the cheek of one friend… I don’t believe I have ever given anything more precious than this mark of deep affection… And to contrast the oppression the flapping of the metronome which regulates our lives, I wanted to show purity and lightness… That’s why I picked the white for the background of the page.

 

In French:

A notre époque, tout nous pousse à la consommation, à l’achat… Une console de jeu par ici, un i-pod par là…. un bijou, un ordinateur, une télévision à écran plat… La société construit ses valeurs sur l’idée de “posséder”.Pour illustrer ce sujet, j’avais envie de mettre en valeur un cadeau simple mais inestimable… un cadeau que tout le monde possède mais qui peut parfois être oublié : l’amour. Et quoi de mieux pour exprimer l’amour que le baiser. Le baiser de deux êtres qui s’aiment, le baiser d’un parent sur le front de son enfant, le baiser sur la joue d’un(e) ami(e)… Je crois n’avoir jamais rien offert de plus précieux que cette marque de profonde affection… Et pour contrecarrer l’effet oppressant que peut avoir le battement du métronome qui rythme nos vies, j’avais envie de pureté, de légèreté…C’est la raison pour laquelle mon choix s’est porté sur le blanc pour ce fond de page.

 

Technique Highlight:

Having taken a photo of my kiss and thanks to my software of modification, I played with the contrast to whiten my skin to such an extent that it can, once the photograph stacked on white paper, become transparent. I then used two rub-ons flowers on the corners of the photograph and paper to reinforce this idea that there is not photograph but direct impression on paper. I like to create a layout with elements which are not very typical in scrapbooking but that, especially, bring me back to simple things: nature. I like the plant foam, the natural and artificial foilages, the flowers.. I also like the small ends of wire netting, pebbles, the small bricks, wood when they are used with time. I enjoy putting them on my layouts. Here, as I chose to illustrate simplicity, I used only two leaves of bracken, picked some time ago and that I had dried between two big books. After the leaf dries, I pasted it on the back with some glue with bookbinding. Then I put it directly on the page before glue is dry. The leaf isn’t damaged with time. I glued together small artificial leaves over these natural leaves of all to create an effect of dimension. My achievements would not be complete if I did not use a thread of aluminum which characterize them. Just take a small segment of this thread, twist it to give it a form which I like then fix it on the layout in the required place. For this page, I used a brad but some hooks can also be used.

 

In French:

Après avoir pris mon baiser en photo, et grâce à mon logiciel de retouche, j’ai joué sur les constrastes pour blanchir ma peau à tel point qu’elle puisse, une fois la photo superposée sur le papier blanc, se confondre avec celui-ci. J’ai ensuite disposé deux rub-ons fleurs à cheval sur la photo et le papier pour renforcer cette idée qu’il n’y a pas de photo mais une impression directe sur le papier. J’aime créer des pages avec des éléments qui sont peu habituels dans le monde du scrap mais qui, surtout, me ramènent à des valeurs simples : la nature. J’aime la mousse végétale, les feuillages naturels et artificiels, les fleurs.. J’aime aussi les petits bouts de grillage, les cailloux, les petites briques, le bois lorsqu’ils sont usés par le temps. Je prends un plaisir immense à les intégrer sur mes pages. Ici, comme j’ai choisi d’illustrer le sujet avec un maximum de simplicité, je n’ai utilisé que deux feuilles de fougère, ceuillies il y a quelques temps et que j’avais séchées entre deux gros livres. Une fois la feuille sèche, je l’ai encollée sur l’envers avec de la colle à reliure puis je l’ai placée directement sur la page avant que la colle ne soit sèche. La feuille ne rique ainsi pas d’être abîmée avec le temps. J’ai collé par-dessus ces feuilles naturelles de toutes petites feuilles artificielles pour créer un effet de relief. Mes réalisations ne seraient pas complètes si je n’employais pas ce fil
d’aluminium qui les caractérisent. Il suffit de prendre un petit segment de ce fil, de le tordre pour lui donner une forme qui nous convienne puis de le fixer sur la page à l’endroit voulu. Pour cette page, j’ai utilisé un brad mais des agrafes peuvent aussi être employées.

 

 

Thank you so much Lydie; we’re so very very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Amy:

Amy Says:

Many special gifts came to mind for this catalyst. I chose to document visually the way I have come to think about pillows I made my boys last holiday season. Their lists were filled with many things, and many of those they received. The “making” of something each year for them has never been a necessity. Instead, the “making” of something beyond what may appear on any list they create fulfills my own need for tradition. Last year, I made pillows, and I involved them in picking colors and fabrics. I wanted these pillows to be with them for many years and to be special – to be symbolic. I wanted each pillow to mirror and reflect something about each boy as he was in that space of time, at that age. As I worked on their pillows, each took on a life of its own in my head. Once they were finished, someone referred to them as “Mama’s Gifts.” It is a concept I talked about after that in an episode of the Creative Mom Podcast. In working on the art for this piece, I had to look anew at what the pillows contain, what I put into them, and what they stand for. As gifts, these were important to me and, thankfully, to them.

 

 


Iris:

Iris Says:

The best gift I ever gave was something I did for myself. I used pay so much attention to my family that I often neglect myself. I have given up on so many dreams and have let go of so many opportunities in the past in favor of my family. I realized that I won’t love my family any less if I start loving myself too. I have then decided to allow myself to dare to dream. I may not have as much chances of succeeding as compared to my youth, but at least I won’t go forever asking myself … “what if?”

 

 


Wendela:

Wendela Says:

That’s absolutely without doubt…our cat!! The best gift for my kids! They love him sooooo much, and pampering him the whole day..He can do tricks, walking like a doll…sitting as an doll…sometimes ha has to wear clothes…but he’s never getting angry, and crabs never! He’s so sweet!!

 

Technique Highlight:

I printed the image on a piece of fabric, and sewed the papers, and the laces together with my sewing machine. After that I added some rub ons, crackle paint, and some flowers..

 

 


Michelle:

 

Michelle Says:

As an aspiring photogrpaher, I would love to think that the photographs I take for people are the best give I have given. To be able to be behind the camera and capture the relationships between families, especially mother and child brings me more joy than I ever thought possible. To be able to give a mom photographs of her and her children the way that I see them is such a gift that I am happy to give over and over again.

 

 


Karen:

Journaling Reads:

A few years ago I finally became an American citizen. I think this is the best gift I could have ever given to my kids.

 

 


Lori:

 

Lori Says:

I think the best gift I have ever given was to my husband when we were dating. I surprised him with tickets to see his favorite hockey team. He was thrilled, to say the least.

 

 


Wilna:

 

Wilna Says:

The best gift I have ever given was birth to my 3 girls. This page is just a celebration of that!

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What’s the best gift you ever gave?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work and you will qualify for the RAK we offer to a random participant. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst Eighty-Three
October 11, 2009, 6:38 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number eighty-three:

 

What’s the one thing you never thought you could do?

 

We’re so excited to have Linda Warlyn as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

The wonderful Larissa on our team recommended Linda to me and I asked her if she’s be a guest for us immediately. Linda’s art has so much emotion and so much detail that I couldn’t wait to see what she would create for us.

 

I asked Linda for a short bio, here’s what she sent: Linda was born and raised in Chicago and has loved to make stuff all her life. She and her wonderful husband Wally have 4 grown children and 2 cute-as-can-be grandchildren. She is self-taught and enjoys just about anything that involves the creative process and getting messy.

 

Linda doesn’t have a website but she told me that you can contact her at ldyintmoon AT aol DOT com if you’d like. And you can find her work in some wonderful magazines like Somerset Life and Artist’s Cafe. I also wanted to share this relatively new interview with you.

 

 

 

 

Here is Linda’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version.

 

 

 

Linda Says:

Although I have created art based on a specific theme like a color or holiday, I’ve never made anything prompted by a particular experience or feeling…I loved it! Thank you so much for giving me this opportunity. The catalyst asking for something I never thought I could do immediately brought to mind the struggle I have thinking of myself as an artist thanks to my inner critic, otherwise known as Raging Bull. I grew up in the 1950’s and mid-century images have a comfort and nostalgic appeal for me. The little girl represents me in my studio. The bottom of this assemblage contains my interpretation of what happens to us if we let the sharp claws and long teeth of the nasty inner critic sink into us. It blinds us to our own unique gifts and binds our ability to create with true abandon and limitless imagination. I like that those feelings are relegated to the bottom and squelched under my desk as I really try to keep my negativity in check. The large image of me is holding a piece of art I made with an “open heart” and a feeling of pride at one of my favorite places on earth, Valley Ridge Art Studio and Retreat in WI. I used vintage gardening images behind me to show that I am growing more comfortable with these feelings of truly thinking of myself as an artist. And I know that as I allow that to happen, my artwork and creativity will be nurtured and flourish as well. Lastly, I wanted this piece to be colorful and have a playful nature to remind all of us that we need to call on our inner child and not that debilitating inner critic when engaged in art making of any kind. It should be a joyous, carefree experience and above all–fun!

 

Technique Highlight:

One technique I love using is adding dimension to my art whenever and wherever I can. I made several copies of the girl and layered them with foam squares in several places to make her more interesting. Small embellishments to her clothing or adding flowers to her hair also add detail and realism.

 

 

Thank you so much Linda; we’re so very very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Larissa:

Larissa Says:

There are several things I never thought I could do like being face to face with a criminal, speak in public; being questioned in public and staying calm; impose myself; and travel on my own. When I think I´ve already done these things, I feel myself like a hero, even if it´s a hero full of flaws, guilt and doubts. I often feel proud of myself just because I have the guts to face all of this. So, I decided to portray this catalyst as a comic story, while pointing the things I never thought I could do.

 

 


Lia:

Lia Says:

My dad insisted that I begin driving lessons right after I began working at my first (and current) real job. I suppose he knew that if he had left it to me, I would probably never get behind the wheel. While I amazingly passed both the basic and advanced theory tests on the first tries – amazing because I barely studied for them – I still did not have the confidence to handle a car. My driving instructor had me driving on an actual road on our 3rd lesson, and I responded with huge eyes, cold hands, dry throat and a ‘WHAT??’ lol. After many months of lessons, I got some confidence on the road and I took the practical driving test … and failed! I finally got my driving license after two more tries, and when I did I knew it was the right time. I knew what I was doing behind the wheel, I was aware of my responsibilities as a driver and my skills were so much better than when I took the first test. 5 years on and I sometimes still can’t believe that the timid girl I was before had the courage to give driving a go and succeeded! I hardly go anywhere without a car now, and I don’t know what I would have done if I didn’t know how to drive!

 

 


Wendela:

Wendela Says:

When I look in the mirror, I see myself, a girl who’s waiting to meet her daddy after many years. This big day is coming soon, never thought this could happen…

 

Technique Highlight:

I used a toilet rol to make this tag holder…I painted It brown, a mixture of paint and crackle medium, when it’s dry, I painted it again with golden paint, and after that with the crackle paint activator…and let dry…after one night, when I came out my bed..I saw these wonderful crackles!!

 

 


Severine:

 

Severine Says:

I think I could never skydive or ride in a balloon, I’d be too scared once in the air to fall powerless to do anything.

 

En Français:

Je pense que je ne pourrais jamais sauter en parachute ou monter dans une montgolfière, j’aurais trop peur une fois dans les airs de tomber sans pouvoir rien faire.

 

 


Karen:

Journaling Reads:

“Come work for me,” he said. I had worked for him before and I loved it. I knew he was a great manager
and possibly the answer to the slump I was having at work. But to go live in Japan for six months?

 

Was he crazy?

 

I had to leave my life. My boyfriend. My home. And move somewhere where I knew no one. Didn’t speak a word of the language. And hated the food.

 

Was he crazy?

 

Was I crazy to be considering it? It scared the crap out of me. And, in the end, that was exactly why I decided to do it. I packed my bags, and moved miles and miles away. Six months in a faraway land.

 

As it turned out, it was some of the best moments of my life. I made friends. I learned Japanese. I worked hard. I proved to myself that I could do it. Leave it all behind and still be ok. Go despite my fears. I still hate the food. But now I know I can do anything I want.

 

I am brave.

 

 


Lori:

Temporarily removed for publication

 

Lori Says:

For me it was to stay at home when I had children. I was afraid I’d be a terrible Mom. I had a great career and just assumed I’d keep climbing that ladder. I really could not imagine not making an income. Staying home is the best decision I’ve ever made that went against everything I was feeling at the time.

 

Journaling Reads:

I never thought I could be a stay-at-home Mom. I grew up believing that I would have a big corporate career. That I would contribute equally to my family if I was to have one. I have always struggled with a lack of patience. I just knew that I would not want to stay home with my kids. I had always, and still do, associated being a good Mom with patience. Once I was pregnant, I was filled with all sorts of fears, but started having a strong desire to leave work. I realized that I wanted to be the one who was home with my new baby. I wanted to be there for everything. I never thought I could. I thought I would be terrible. I’m so grateful I did.

 

Technique Highlight:

I traced and cut a heart out of patterned paper. Then cut it into thin strips horizontally. I removed every other strip after placing it on my page. I then sewed in between each strip and around the heart.

 

 


Rachel:

 

Journaling Reads:

I always thought that it was a bit of a cliché… wishful or hopeful thinking. You couldn’t possibly see or define or be part of a miracle. It was something that you could not see, touch or prove It was based on opinion and belief. So I dismissed the idea and categorized it away where fairy tales and day dreams live, a thing that would be lovely but would never really happen to me. Until it did. March 2004, I found out that a life was living and growing within me and I knew. Miracles do exist. They happen all the time and all around you. I never thought it would happen to me, but it did. I got to be a part of a miracle. And her name is Roslyn Mae Hall.

 

Technique Highlight:

I wanted to use this particular font of thickers for this layout, but did not want them in white which was all that I had available to me when I created this layout. I wanted to be sure to maintain the glitter effect of the letters so instead of simply painting them as I have done before, I used alcohol ink to die them. This allowed me to change the color and keep the glitter. To do this I used a Q-tip to dab the ink directly onto the letters. A simple and versatile way to make your letters work with every layout.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What’s the one thing you never thought you could do?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work and you will qualify for the RAK we offer to a random participant. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst Eighty-Two
October 4, 2009, 8:51 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number eighty-two:

 

What’s your superpower?

 

We’re so excited to have Susan Tuttle as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

If there’s one thing I can say about Susan’s art, it’s that each piece is full of emotion. It might be haunting, sorrow, joy, confusion, curiosity, wonder or millions of others. But each piece is dripping with emotion and it makes it impossible for me to look away when I am staring at one of her pieces.

 

Susan’s first book, Exhibition 36: Mixed-Media Demonstrations + Explorations, was released by North Light Books in December 2008, and her second book, Digital Expressions: Creating Digital Art with PS Elements, a technique-based publication on digital art, will be published by North Light Books in April 2010. Susan is also a frequent contributor to Stampington & Company publications and other mixed-media books. She also teaches digital art workshops on the subjects of photomanipulation, digital montage, and a variety of Photoshop techniques online.

 

If you haven’t seen her amazing art, make sure to visit her site and her blog.

 

 

 

 

Here is Susan’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and more detail.

 

 

 

Susan Says:

My superpower is inner strength — it is both something that I feel glowing strong inside of me, and something I will cultivate my whole life through. I have had many instances for practicing the “art of inner strength” in my life thus far, and am sure to encounter more. Instead of telling you my personal stories, I wish to share with you what I have learned from the experiences. For every human being, there are inevitably times of darkness in life — trials to go through, hard lessons to learn. We always have a choice, even if we hit rock bottom. We can choose to embrace hope and trust in both ourselves and in a loving Universe that has our best interests at heart, or we can choose fear, anger and bitterness. We can call up that inner strength that resides in our core and it will rise to the occasion as soon as we summon it. We can let go and let our inner strength buoy us along as we learn those hard lessons, moving us toward the light, picking up even more strength as we step forward, one foot in front of the other, one step at a time, with the pinhole of light in the distance growing larger and larger still, until we arrive, standing in a room full of perfect light and joy.

 

This particular digital piece which I have named “Inner Light” personifies inner strength. Instead of describing what this piece means to me, I want you to discover what it means to you.

 

Technique Highlight:

The imagery used in this piece is of my dear friend Jessica. When I create digital art, or any type of art for that matter, I must feel a strong emotional connection to at least one of the imagery elements in the composition. Doing so is a powerful experience that allows me to infuse the work with personal meaning, feeling, and even love. For me, using personal imagery immediately sparks an authentic, creative process.

 

 

Thank you so much Susan; we’re so very very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Amy:

Amy Says:

My concept for this piece, and my “superpower,” is that I “juggle” many things, many aspects of my life, many roles, many interests, and many threads that make up the day to day. I don’t think of it as a superpower. It is just “me” and how I respond to the forces around and within me. It isn’t even something that’s obvious or visible always in the world of surfaces in which we live. As I worked, I began to question if maybe I should have termed my superpower the ability to multitask. But, in the end, juggling and multitasking occupy a similar space. It took a while to settle on an approach to this set of panels. I started out seeing many dialogue strips surrounding a central panel, spelling out all the things that vie for my time and attention, all the things I keep in the air. But as I sketched out the panels, I moved away from the text. I stripped the piece down to a visual essence, letting the balls speak for themselves. When I inked the large panel, I decided at the last minute to leave a space for a caption, and for several days the piece sat, finished, but the caption blank. With only one space for text, finding the right words to explain this piece was difficult. Many words would have worked. Many words would have stated the obvious.

 

 


Wilna:

Wilna Says:

If I can have a superpower, i would love to be a heart reader. It’s just something I made up and someone who can: Discern heart motives. I think it would be totally awesome to know how someone feels in their heart. Even to be able to know + understand my own heart. But even though I cant do it, i have a heart reader with me all the time: He is called my Comforter, Counselor, Helper, Intercessor, Advocate, Strengthener and my Standby. And for that I thank you my wonderful God.

 

 


Opal:

Opal Says:

I see my superpower as not one thing, or word, or concept, but a blending and melding of my life’s experiences and faith. The people I have known and admired, my family and friends..those select few who I considered “my people”.. are in my balcony cheering me on, giving advice and nudges, suggestions, strength, and encouragement when I need it. My superpower comes from within. This piece is done in fabric with strips of vibrant color and line filling and weaving into the O (for Opal) that represent all those experiences….the circles represent my balcony…hand appliqued, hand and machine quilted.

 

 


Severine:

 

Severine Says:

My superpower was in number, i love numbers, I have some ease with numbers. “40” is the departement i was born, and i don’t have any superpower without my “origins”.

 

En Français:

On va dire que mon superpouvoir réside dans les chiffres, j’ai toujours aimer les chiffres et le calcul, j’ai quelques facilités avec. Le “40” est pour le département où je suis née, parce qu’il n’y aurait pas de pouvoir sans mes origines.

 

 


Karen:

Journaling Reads:

i’m not sure if it’s a superpower if it’s also something that ends up hurting me the most. can it be both? it must be.
because my ability to love wholly, fully, with all my self and all my heart is my super power. the one thing that makes me, me.
and it’s my magic, my genuine-ness, my ability to give you all i have and ask for nothing in return because once i love you, once i trust you, i am here for you, forever, all of me. forever.

 

 


Lori:

 

Lori Says:

I don’t like the notion of super powers. I don’t like society saying women need to be “SUPER”. Women are beautiful just as they are with all their weaknesses and strengths. I’ve spent a great deal of time trying to find my balance and live in the now. I want to be at peace with who I am and what I have. This is a difficult goal, but very worthwhile to me.

 

Journaling Reads:

I have no super powers. I just try to do the best I can each and every day. I’m finally learning that life is about being joyful with all I have and being at peace in the present day.

 

 


Anita:

 

Anita Says:

I guess I never thought of it as a Super Power but I believe I have the ability to “read” people upon first meeting. I usually am a good judge of character and can tell upon first meeting whether I am gonna like that person or not. Whether they are happy or sad. Have a good life or a troubled one. I can usually sense these things about people.

 

 


Rachel:

 

Journaling Reads:

“Please.” “Thank you.” “You’re welcome.”

 

Phases that are heard all too seldom now a days. Common niceties tossed aside for a me first, gimme attitude that is so prevalent in this day and age. I often find myself wondering what happened to good manners, common courtesies and respect. I refuse to fall into the lazy and bad habits of not being polite and manner-ful. So my super power? You can call me Ms. Manners,

 

Thank you.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What’s your superpower?” I urge you to give it a try. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work and you will qualify for the RAK we offer to a random participant. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 




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