creative Therapy


Catalyst Fifty-Five
March 29, 2009, 8:20 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number fifty-five:

 

Tell us about a time you felt unconditional love for someone or something.

 

We’re so excited to have Melodee Langworthy as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

I’ve had the pleasure of meeting Melodee a year ago at a weekend workshop and she is, by far, one of the nicest people I’ve met. I’ve always been awed by her talented use of stamps and rubons, two things I have a lot of and use rarely.

 

If you read scrapbooking magazines you’ll know that she has been published in Creative Keepsakes, Memory Makers and Scrapbooks Etc. Legacy magazine and graced the covers of three magazines. She also teaches classes all over the world, in person and on her site. Melodee’s unique classes incorporate her love of photography with her creative stamping techniques. You will always find a fun mix of graphic stamping styles.

 

You can find most of the stamps Melodee uses at the Art Warehouse stamp site and if you’ve never seen her art, you are really missing out, so make sure to check out her blog.

 

 

 

 

Here is Melodee’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version with more detail.

 

 

 

Journaling Reads:

I treasure each and every visit we have with our Birth Mother. To have the chance to share his young journey with her makes my heart happy…for her to bond with him.

 

We are so thankful that we were able to have an “open adoption”. We could not have been blessed with a sweeter lady!

 

Technique Highlight:

 

 

If I had to pick only one tool to create with, it would have to be stamps for my art projects. Stamping is one of the best choices to really expand your color choices, text and embellishments in your art projects and never run out of the product! I really love the fact that you can use the same image/text in one color…come back and stamp in a different color and it creates and entirely different emotion in your project just by changing up inks.

 

In this project I opted to use a mix of Creative Cafe rub-ons along with some stamping to give added depth to project.

 

By stamping or using rub-ons on buttons you also can make some very fun embellishments.

 

Another great way to stretch your dollar and obtain a great look is by making your own tags out of coordinating paper. I simply cut out tags in several different sizes and used as layers in various places in the layout.

 

For my title I stamped and layered with dotted line rub-ons in the upper left corner to add a bit of a graphic feel. By utilizing images that were already printed in the background paper, I created button embellishments adhering a rub-on in the center.

 

The journaling section is a blended mix of stamps, rub-ons, layered paper and hand journaling.

 

 

Thank you so much Melodee; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Wendela:

Wendela Says:

When I was a little girl, 8 years old, my sweet girlfriend had a lovely big brother! I wished he were MY big brother, because he was tall, with brown hair, blue eyes, and sooo sooo sweet… I think at that moment, I was really In love with him…but I was too young…and he 5 years older….

 

About 12 years later….we fell in love, engaged, and we married!!! And now many years later..we have 4 kids, and are still in love with each other!

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

I must say my first experience with true, deep, unconditional love was my husband but then my son was born and the power of loving someone that small, someone whom I carried inside me for nine months and someone who is so much a part of me is indescribable. I will forever love him and my love for him will always be unbounded.

 

Why is this in a binder?

 


Lia:

 

Lia Says:

My current favorite bag. It has my unconditional love, which it totally deserves. It carries all I need and more, even substituting as my crop bag when I’m heading to a crop from the office. It matches all my outfits, and gives me a touch of glam even in my dowdy-est clothes. Even after my cat pee-d on it *sigh*, I love it still. It’s not the most expensive of my bags, but it is serving me well. I *heart* it!

 

 


Opal:

Opal Says::

Without a doubt, I know the moment I felt unconditional love. I was at work, teaching a class of 6th graders, and it was towards the end of the school day when two boxes were delivered to my classroom. I opened them as the last child was out the door, and was stunned to find two dozen long stemmed pink rose buds. I was puzzled. It wasn’t my birthday or anniversary…who would be sending me roses? I opened the tiny card, and read….”To our Grandma…from Baby A and Baby B…”, and then saw the sonogram image…and in that instant, my heart flooded with unconditional love, for my daughter, and my grand babies.

 

 


Lori:

 

Lori Says:

I always believe that love should be unconditional, else why bother. I didn’t realize the depth and power of a love for a child until I had one. I have no love for any other that runs as true, deep and unconditional as does the love for my children.

 

Journaling Reads:

I never knew the meaning of unconditional love, until you.

 

 


Larissa:

 

Larissa Says:

When it comes to unconditional love the only one I know is what I feel for my daughter, which I felt since the very first moment I saw her, all redden and wrinkled, yelling before this strange world to which she was arriving.

 

I wanted to protect her from everything and everyone, give her everything I couldn’t have, see her flourishing like a beautiful flower, turning my life into something rich and meaningful!

 

The last time I was taken away by a plenitude, unconditional love sensation, happened on a Friday morning on December 2008 when she was dressed as Tinker bell. She was as happy as ever, running around the garden, touching the flowers, climbing up the trees and allowing herself to be photographed, aware of the fact she looked lovely!

 

And I only questioned myself if I would be worth that miracle, that preciousness, which I know I will love it forever, with all intensity and every part of my being!

 

Journaling Reads:

For a moment I saw

A beautiful fairy

Running happily

Around my garden…

For a moment

I thought…

“It’s a miracle –

She’s too beautiful!”

For a moment

I knew…

That all my dreams

This little fairy will turn them true

Poor fairy,

Runs happily

Around the garden

Without knowing she carries

Her mommy’s

Dreams to be lived…

 

 


Lucy:

 

Lucy Says:

The first time I felt unconditional love was when I had my daughter. The love that I feel for her is unconditional and will always be. I created this mini book with some of my definitions of unconditional love. I started with a mini chipboard binder from the AMM march kit and painted with layers of acrylic paint and then layers of stamping and masking. I distressed the words and hearts with charcoal pencil and water soluable wax crayons. The hearts are freeform cut from an old dictionary. This book is dedicated to her and has a letter from me in one of the envelopes.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “Tell us about a time you felt unconditional love for someone or something.” I urge you to give it a try. This was a particularly healing catalyst for our team, I hope it will prove to be that way for you, too. Embrace the healing power of art. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work and you will qualify for the RAK we offer to a random participant. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



RAK Recipient
March 25, 2009, 6:35 pm
Filed under: catalyst

catalyst_rak_winner

Since we have a new RAK as of two weeks ago, we can now pick a recipient for our previous RAK. The little boy picked your name Bethany Congratulations!! Thanks, once again, to our generous sponsor: Sakura of America. I will email you with directions on how to receive your RAK.

 

As always, I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone for your ongoing support, generosity of spirit, and for sharing your own journeys with us. It is so inspiring and therapeutic to me.

 

Thank you.



Catalyst Fifty-Four
March 22, 2009, 8:10 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number fifty-four:

 

What’s something you wish you could do? (Something you know how but are too afraid to try.)

 

We’re so overjoyed to have Cathy Zielske as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

If you’ve been scrapbooking for any time at all, you must have heard of Cathy Zielske and if you haven’t, you’ll be glad you did now.

 

Cathy was the Art Director of Simple Scrapbooks Magazine (which has sadly just released its last issue). She has also authored two fantastic books Clean and Simple Scrapbooking and Clean and Simple Scrapbooking – The Sequal as well as contributing to many special editions put out by Simple Scrapbooking Magazine. She also used to write a fantastic column in Simple Scrabooking magazine called About Design. You can now download 2007 and 2008 archives of this column here. Cathy also teaches classes at Big Picture Scrapboooking. I took her “Design Your Life” class last year and it’s one of the best classes I’ve ever taken. You can now sign up for her new class Everyone Can Write a Little.

 

I can honestly go on and on about Cathy. How talented she is, how much I love her simple and authentic style, how good a teacher she is, etc. But, in my opinion, the best part of Cathy is her sense of humor. How witty and funny she is and how much she makes me laugh. You can get a great glimpse of her wonderful personality and find out a lot more about her by reading her awesome blog.

 

 

 

 

Here is Cathy’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version with more detail.

 

 

 

Journaling Reads:

One of my biggest fears—aside from someone I love dying, or me dying, or you dying, or someone you know dying—is the fear of success. I know I shouldn’t fear Success. Success is good. It’s a tricked out bus that rolls into town and everyone who paid for a ticket is in love with you, and everything that you’ve done to achieve this phenomenal state of being. But I fear it, because sitting right in the front, is the big, bad-assed chickie called ‘Failure.’ And Failure takes up more than one seat on the bus. In fact, she takes several. And she makes sure you are fully aware that you get off when SHE pulls the cord. Not the other way around. In effect, the fear of Failure exerts a certain pressure over you to just stay in your seat. Don’t move. Don’t breathe. Don’t change places with anyone. And always, and I mean always get off at the appropriate stop.

 

I fear standing up on the bus, and saying, “Sorry. I’m getting off right here, because I’ve got some serious shit to do.” The thing is, Failure, as I’ve found, isn’t that devastating, and I always, always emerge with something new. Something of value. Something to help guide my way. So why is that so hard for me to embrace?

 

Right now, I’m trying to just stand up, pull the cord, and get off. And I’m trying really hard to believe it’s the right choice.

 

Technique Highlight:

The only techniques were to hit the photos with a few Totally Rad Actions, from TRA 2, The Revenge set. The rest of the page was built using Adobe Indesign, as most of my pages are.

 

 

Thank you so much Cathy; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Lia:

Lia Says:

I like to see myself as someone who can sew. I’ve got a pretty impressive collection of yummy fabrics, and I do have some basic skills on the sewing machine. But I haven’t been able to commit to that vision of myself. I get very inspired by people like Amy Butler and Heather Bailey – they who can whip up such gorgeous sewing projects. I wish I could be like them. I suppose it’s something that I would have to work on … but somehow I have a feeling that no matter how much work I put in it, I would never be a Amy Butler. I’ll always be a wannabe.

 

Technique Highlight:

As this layout is about me wanting to sew great like Amy Butler, I added sewing elements into the project – buttons, fabrics and pins. I also stitched on the Amy Butler fabric cutout to emphasize the ‘sewing feel’. The stitching was also done around the patterned paper in the background.

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

This one was easy for me. I’ve always always always wanted to be a published author. Fiction. Reading has always been and will always be my number one passion in the world and I’ve always dreamt of being one of those authors on people’s shelves. I have started several novels and have done a lot of writing over the years but I have never taken it all the way. Never fully finished, edited, and sent out a book to a publisher. In the last six years, I have mostly stopped writing altogether but I still think of it from time to time and the desire to become a published writer has not subsided one little bit.

 

Why is this in a binder?

 


Dedra:

 

Journaling Reads:

Afraid! I would love to have contracts with boutiques to sell the minibooks I design….I know I could do it….I’m SO shy and afraid….Maybe I’m afraid of success? Now the questions is how to move past the fear and go forward toward a dream….Taking the chance!

 

 


Severine:

Severine Says::

I really want to ride a horse but I’m terribly afraid.

 

 


Debee:

 

Debee Says:

I love reading devotions based on the Bible written by Beth Moore. The actual journaling is from a page in one of her book of devotions. I’m learning to grow my faith. It’s a life lesson I wish I could learn with more progress. Without fear. At times I feel as if I need more patience with myself to do that. But I’m thankful that my faith in God remains true. It is something that despite wanting to learn to excel in other areas of my hobbies, I find I long to learn to live my faith a daily reminder. This in the end will outlast any art I ever make. And that is what makes it much more worthwhile :)

 

 


Larissa:

 

Larissa Says:

I wish I could have the courage to go skydiving. I would love the free fall and the adrenaline!

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What’s something you wish you could do? (Something you know how but are too afraid to try.)” I urge you to give it a try. This was a particularly healing catalyst for our team, I hope it will prove to be that way for you, too. Embrace the healing power of art. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work and you will qualify for the RAK we offer to a random participant. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst Fifty-Three
March 15, 2009, 8:05 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number fifty-three:

 

Create a piece of art around a memory or occasion that has no photos.

 

We’re so excited to have Jennifer McGuire as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

Jennifer McGuire whote the first scrapbooking book I read that was not only inspiring but incredibly practical and useful. I still remember buying and reading 101 Things You Can Do With Your Scrapbook Supplies. I bent the corners of each page where I saw something that I wanted to try. By the end of the book, More than half the pages were bent. So it should be no surprise that Jennifer was on my list of people to ask, not to mention she was also one of the first requested guests in our flickr group.

 

Jennifer has been published in all your favorite scrapbooking magazines, she was a 2002 CK Hall of Famer, and she’s been in multiple the Autumn Leaves “Designing With…” books. She’s also on multiple design teams including being a Garden Girl for Two Peas in a Bucket and a Hero Artist.

 

I can’t really believe that you’ve never seen Jennifer’s work but in the small chance you haven’t, make sure to check out her blog.

 

 

 

 

Here is Jennifer’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version and more detail.

 

 

 

Jennifer Says:

I have been a bit down lately. I think a HUGE part of it is the weather. It just seems like it has been bitter cold forever – it feels like a long winter. And this makes me think about my favorite memory… being in the islands with my family. We go there often and really feel at home and happiest there. So I decided to bring a little sunshine in my day by making cards for my husband and two step-daughters that were inspired by the colors of the islands. I can’t tell you how good it felt to create these. My soul felt lifted and it felt so much better right away. It is amazing how being creative and thinking of a favorite memory can make you smile. :)

 

Technique Highlight:

I wanted to capture the colors and textures of the island. I layered lots of papers on front of a card. I then sewed around the edges and went back and tucked pop dots under some of the edges for dimension. I dabbed ink here and there to blend the layers. Glitter glue was perfect for adding sparkle to the “water.” For the sky, I smeared white liquid pearls over the sky and smeared them, adding a pearly look. A bit of sparkle embossing powder added to the shine of the sun.

 

 

Thank you so much Jennifer; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team. We have a lot of art this week for your enjoyment.

 

Lucy:

Lucy Says:

One of my dearest friends is getting married next week and I wanted to celebrate our friendship by making her a gift to let her know how much she means to me. I cannot wait to see her expression when she receives it!

 

Technique Highlight:

I have been so inspired lately by Kelly Rae Roberts and worked with some of the techniques that she uses to make my wooded mixed media wall art. I began with a wooden board and collaged patterned papers onto it, then built up layers with paint, charcoal pencil and stamping. I sketched the girls first in pencil and then painted them with acrylic paints. After adding some additional stamps and phrases, I coated the piece with melted bees wax and etched into it while it was still warm, then rubbed burnt umber oil paint into the cracks to distress. A little hand buffing and it was complete!

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

When we were planning our wedding, the one thing we spent the most amount of money on was our photographer. We figured the photos were the best way to preserve our memories of the special day. We found this person who looked really professional, had great albums, etc and decided to go with him. He did show up and take a bunch of photos and he even delivered us our proofs and album. The deal was that a year later he would give us the negatives. Except that when the year passed, he went completely awol. We couldn’t get him to answer the phone or email. We were never able to get in touch with him again and, to the day, don’t have one negative from our wedding day. We still have the album we bought but if you come to our house, you won’t see any wedding photos on our tables because we have none.

 

Why is this in a binder?

 


Dedra:

 

Journaling Reads:

We passed notes in the hall between classes…. We talked about everything from boyfriends to what we wanted to do in our lives….We lifted each other up….When we were not at school or with family we were hanging out….You started every note and yearbook entry with “Hey Woman!”….We were the best of friends….We talked about going to the same college, our plan was to be life-long best friends….I will never forget that night in May….You were days from graduation and I was staying over at your house….the accident happened….I wish you would have come with me instead….A piece of me died with you that night….My best friend gone in an instant….I often wonder about the amazing woman you would have become….I will always cherish your notes! – 3.2009

 

Dedra Says:

This catalyst really hit home for me….My best friend from High School was tragically killed in an accident right before graduation….I have kept some of the notes she had written to me right before her death….

 

The journaling talks about our friendship….To be honest creating this layout brought many emotions, some happy and some very sad….I have not created any piece of art for Brantley and it felt good to document what she meant to me….

 

I wanted to create a layout that had a place for her notes and that I could untie to read them anytime I wanted too….So, the ribbons untie and I’m able to take the notes directly out of the layout….

 

 


Katie:

Katie Says::

When I was a little girl, kindergarten to be exact, I made a tiny patchwork quilt for my teacher. Well, not exactly a quilt…it ended up being so little that I made it into a pillow. Back when I was a kid some company used to send fabric samples to my Mom. Just little tiny squares, probably about 2×2. Anyway, she would give me what she didn’t want and I would use them as Barbie blankets or whatever else I could come up with. Well, my kindergarten teacher became pregnant and was going to have a baby. I decided that I would make her a patchwork quilt for the baby. So, I sewed and sewed for what seemed like forever…I remember sitting in front of the TV watching Little House On The Prairie and sewing my little heart out. When it was done it was so small and I was so disappointed. So my Mom sent me up the street to a ladies house that sewed and had me ask for a piece of fabric big enough to sew to the back. The lady gave me a piece of fabric (I think it was satiny) and some stuffing for it. I finished the pillow and was so excited to give it to my teacher. I remember being really embarrassed about it and having to present it to her during carpet time. I wish I had a picture of that little pillow but at least I have the memory of my first craft project and my first turn something into something else project.

 

Technique Highlight::

So, I knew that I wanted to do something patchwork for this project…and that I wanted to turn something not quite good enough into something else. I found this tin at the Goodwill and covered the front to make it into something that I love. Now I just have to wait for Fall to really enjoy it!

 

 


Kimmi:

 

Kimmi Says:

One of the greatest memories that I have since my husband and I were together was my 21st birthday. We had only been dating about two and a half months and I wasn’t used to having things greatly given to me on my birthdays. He had an entire weekend planned ahead of time. My actual birthday fell on a Saturday that year. Friday night, he took me out to eat at Mansur’s on the Boulevard. We had a full meal, dessert and wine (We’ll just say we’ve only been able to afford to go back there once since!). On Saturday, we woke up pretty early and headed out to Baton Rouge. We saw a movie, had lunch at my favorite mexican restaurant, he took me clothes shopping at the mall, then we had drinks at an upscale wine bar, then out to the river to the casino and dinner at Shuck’s on the levee. I’m not sure why I didn’t have my camera on me that day, but it is definitely one of the greatest memories and best birthdays I’d ever had.

 

 


Lori:

 

Journaling Reads:

Now 15 months into a world-wide recession, there is no sight of the end. Indicators suggest another long year before we reach bottom. There is pain and fear, loss of jobs, homes and health care. I pray the end is near. I pray for healing.

 

Lori Says:

I wanted to document what is happening with the economy. I plan to make several pages about the recession. It’s a difficult time for many and my heart aches.

 

 


Larissa:

 

Larissa Says:

Unfortunately, I almost don’t have photos of my childhood, but I remember how I used to play with paper dolls at my granny’s house, having a great time with all her boxes. She used to have boxes for everything: buttons, sewing, laces and knitting. She also had a closet full of special drawers filled with colored pencils, brushes and oil paints. It was amazing to explore her stuff. My mother also had a big box with card games, a collection of 1000 games, which was filled with dominoes, stones, cards, dices and a lot of small pieces. I can’t estimate the time I spent exploring and playing with these treasures boxes.

 

So, I made myself a memory box that celebrates this time and all my childhood playtimes memories.

 

 

Technique Highlight:

I altered a chocolate candy paper box. After painting it, I prepared a collage background and filled everything with Graphic 45 papers and something else from old books and coloring books. I also added some cards, embellishments and memorabilia.

 

 


Opal:

 

Opal Says:

My memory for this prompt is fairly recent, as memories go, and is one I hope to remember for years to come, and is not recorded by a photo. It was a moment, one of many in a week, when a charming and precocious little boy, a friend’s son, asked me to play a game of Sorry. In feigning ignorance of the game rules, I was delighted to learn the rules through the words of a five year old. Our game was interrupted by this and that, but it continued over the course of a few days. Our play brought squeals of laughter, and delight in sweet revenge, as the game is so named. The game went beyond the mechanics of moving around the board. It was a time to be charmed and a time to share.

 

My piece for this prompt shows the essentials of the game Sorry. The layers are quilted by machine, the game pieces are fused on, and the cards are resized photo copies. The orange striped fabric offset on the black with white wonky dot fabric has the feel of a memory…timeless, floating, askew a bit, and somewhat larger than life.

 

 


Amy:

 

Amy Says:

The memory that came to mind is one that often comes to mind even though the details remain vague. The moment centers around me as a girl making of a pair of shorts. (How old was I? I don’t know.) To complicate matters, I’d decided to make them patchwork, combining green and polka-dot fabrics. (Was it my first sewing project? I’m not sure.) Something went awry, however. To this day, I have a habit of assembling things backwards and/or inside out. Whatever happened that day must have been similar. I got frustrated and threw the shorts in the trash. (Did I actually do this? Or just want to? I’m not sure.) My grandmother retrieved them, fixed the problem, and went on. (Did I wear those shorts? I don’t know.)

 

When I decided to put this memory into fabric, representing the shorts seemed easy enough, but I envisioned a small sewing machine in the frame as well. Quickly it became clear that the machine was the focus of the collaged piece and the hinge upon which the memory builds. The shorts, rendered small, are left hanging just off the bottom tail, a thread of memory, a stepping stone in a creative journey.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “Create a piece of art around a memory or occasion that has no photos.” I urge you to give it a try. This was a particularly healing catalyst for our team, I hope it will prove to be that way for you, too. Embrace the healing power of art. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

One of our recurring sponsors, Coordinates Collections, is giving away a $20 gift certificate this week.

 

 

Leave us comments with your work and you will qualify for the RAK we offer to a random participant. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst Fifty-Two
March 8, 2009, 6:26 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number fifty-two:

 

Tell us about something you’ve always wanted to learn.

 

We’re so thrilled to have Teresa Collins as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

I have always loved Teresa’s designs and products so I was really excited when I got a chance to meet her at CHA last year.

 

What I didn’t know then was how incredibly sweet and kind and generous she is. How her husband not only attends CHA with her but spends hours and hours doing make and takes with hundreds of scrapbookers. They are some of the nicest people I met at the show. Now I love her products and her art even more because I can see her wonderful personality in each piece.

 

If you don’t read Teresa’s blog you’re really missing out because she has a magical way with words and it’s a great opportunity to see the amazing woman behind the beautiful designs. And in the rare chance you’re one of the few who hasn’t seen her products, make sure to check out her site.

 

 

 

 

Here is Teresa’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version.

 

 

 

Journaling Reads:

In high school, I thought it would be cool to take the required two years of FRENCH- as my Foreign Language. Then at Brigham Young University, I took two more years. My professor could tell that I had a hard time with the pronunciation. I often regret this decision. I wish I had taken Spanish classes instead. I have regretted it for years- I WISH i could understand the language that so many Americans now use- 2/2009

 

Technique Highlight:

I did an alphabet mask with stickers. I did not like the font used on the stickers so I cut them to be more “me.” Then I used my ink pad – black archival ink- to put ink over the alphabet word. I then peeled the alphabet letters up.

 

 

Thank you so much Teresa; we’re so very honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team. We have a lot of art this week and you’ll notice another new member on our team, Lucy.

 

Lucy:

Lucy Says:

This catalyst and my first as a design team member really struck home with me. I am always learning and trying out so many new techniques and then have bits and pieces of projects started all over. One of my goals this year is to put these pieces together and use them in my art work. In this mixed media fiber art, I have combined my first attempts at wire work in the birds nest and then embossed paper beads that have been sitting around for a couple of months. The cheese cloth some hand dyed work from over a year ago! The thing I wish I would learn to do is finish. Complete more artwork… combine more techniques… continue to grow as an artist.

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

I’ve always been a worrier. All the time and about everything. When I was pregnant with my first baby, I put a sign over my door that said “give up that there’s something wrong.” and I looked at it every day. Over the last four years, I’ve gone up and down on this. And this year, I’ve decided to put extra focus on achieving peace and letting go of worry. Though, I must admit the relatively rough pregnancy hasn’t helped a lot, I really have been working hard at letting it go. If there’s one thing I’d love to learn, it’s letting go of worry.

 

Why is this in a binder?

 

Technique Highlight:

This piece is inspired by the amazing Kelly Rae Roberts. I used several of the techniques she teaches in her book “Taking Flight.” The wings have glitter glue on them that makes them shine and they are made out of wire and tissue paper.

 

 


Dedra:

 

Journaling Reads:

I’ve always wanted to learn how to quilt and crochet…. Making a quilt out of Heather Bailey material would be heavenly…. The thought of being able to create something for my family…. Something that would keep them cozy and warm…. Another piece of me that could be passed down to the next generations of our family…. Maybe someday!!!! 2.28.09

 

 


Wendela:

Wendela Says::

What I’ve always wanted to learn is..”to dance like a ballerina girl”. I made this wallhanger with a ballerina image from internet. The background is a piece of currogated cardboard, and I stitched the image on the paper, with my sewing machine, and added that on the fabric and on the cardboard.

 

 


Severine:

 

Severine Says:

I wanted to learn to be cool, or Zen and have no stress !!!

 

Technique Highlight:

Canvas, Gesso, old paper book, glimmer mist, ribbon and american craft chipboard.

 

 


Kris:

 

Kris Says:

I’ve never understood people who are so glad to be done with high school or college. I love learning! I always dream about going back to school for art classes. Fiber arts, painting, sculpting, printmaking, metalwork, jewelry design. You name it, I wanna at least try it. I’m hoping to be able to attend college again soon. When I was in high school I loved languages. I wanted to learn as many as I could and then be an interpreter at the UN. Hey, it was a goal! I still love learning languages. My daughter is taking French and I’m picking some of it up. When my husband was in the military I studied Korean with a friend for a few months and I took 5 years of Spanish during my school days. It’s too hard to pick just one thing I’ve ‘always wanted to learn.’ There are so many things I want to know, so many books to read and so many opportunities to learn. I am a perpetual learner. I pray I never lose that desire.

 

Technique Highlight:

A simple collage set into a wooden frame with vintage jewelry parts, silver string for a chain and glitter galore.

 

 


Larissa:

 

Larissa Says:

I’ve always wanted to learn how to draw and paint. I had the dream that I would do my own paintings, watercolors and whatever I wanted. When I was a teenager, I started having drawing lessons, but I quit it very soon, so unmotivated. Since then, I just have considered myself as someone who simply didn’t have the talent to draw, someone who simply could not draw.

 

But one day, about three years or four years ago, I started scrapbooking and I made myself a mental list of things I wanted to learn: to draw, to sew, to photograph, to work on some computer skills… I decided to work these skills gradually and drawing was the first skill I decided to work on. I found an artist who loves teaching and I began my way towards color, lines and my soul.

 

One year later, I realized I could draw, do watercolor and acrylic paintings.

 

I’m totally amazed by this new fantastic world that has been opening up in my life. Now I consider myself capable of learning everything I really want, as long as I put some effort on it.

 

Technique Highlight:

I drew and painted my watercolor background. After highlighting some lines with a dark pen, I worked on the layers for my scrapbooking page.

 

 


Debee:

 

Debee Says:

I can’t really remember when it really happened. But it for sure was recently. Maybe back a year or 2? I had gotten to the point where I felt like I could accomplish anything I put my mind to. This of course had to come with the same idea as, well, I will TRY my hand at something BUT I have to be honest with myself. I cannot expect perfection the first time around. In comes my wacky desire to learn to sew…and so maybe sewing on paper doesn’t really count. But I still love it. I found a way to express myself with that medium. Then came embroidery…I think I just wanted to see the pretty rainbow of colorful skeins around my studio space. But I tried it and it made me happy. Perfect? Not really. But that was just my first try. Then came this ridiculous idea of crochet. For years I saw my grandmothers’ art and their expression through crochet. Could I possibly learn? I live too far away from one of my grandmothers, and the other has since given up the art due to arthritis. Carpal tunnel and all, I started it. I signed up for my first crochet class stuck in the beginners group along with two 8 year olds and a 10 year old. Great. But that’s not so bad. Afterall, I’m just learning and I’m sure later it will make a great story to tell my kids. They’ll ask, ” Mom who taught you to crochet? Grandma?” Nope. Kiddos. For the sake of learning something new, you have to put yourself outside of your comfort zone. Sit with the 8 year olds and learn something. All the while I’m learning another art form. Another new expression. I cannot wait to see where this takes me.

 

 


Christine:

 

Christine Says:

A couple of years ago I had the pleasure of listening to a musician playing hymns on a harp. Ever since I’ve heard the beautiful melodies, I’ve wanted to learn to play the harp. To me that would be truly heavenly!

 

 


Opal:

 

Opal Says:

A friend recently told me that I never relax. At first I protested, but realized that she was right. I don’t relax, ever, unless I am in a forced situation, maybe at a spa having a massage…yes, I think that I might relax then. But taking time for myself and relaxing is something I wish I had learned. My role model while growing up was my busy mother. My mom, who had a great many ‘momisms’ for every possible situation in life….would tell me, “Idle hands are the work of the devil.” Her words were gospel truth…and I wanted nothing to do with the devil. I never learned to relax. Through all of my college and working years, my days were shaped by carefully numbered items on a TTD (Things To Do) list. And even now, in my 7th year of retirement, I find great comfort in listing things to be done in a day, and I enjoy a sense of accomplishment when I can check off this task and that one. There just isn’t time to relax.. Thinking about what I would do to relax, I see myself sitting in a rocking chair with a good book or watching the birds in the Madrona tree outside my windows. Maybe I would close my eyes and have a little ‘shut eye’ for a few minutes. My piece shows my rocking chair with a pair of hands trying to relax, but with the image of the devil there trying to do his work. I wish I had learned to relax.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “Tell us about something you’ve always wanted to learn.” I urge you to give it a try. This was a particularly healing catalyst for our team, I hope it will prove to be that way for you, too. Embrace the healing power of art. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work and you will qualify for the RAK we offer to a random participant. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



Catalyst Fifty-One
March 1, 2009, 9:33 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number fifty-one:

 

What’s something you do every day just for yourself? (If nothing comes to mind, create the art around what the one thing would be and why you’re not doing it.)

 

We’re so excited to have Alexis Hardy as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

My friend Lori put me in touch with Alexis and from the moment I saw her art, I knew she’d be an amazing guest.

 

Alexis’s pieces are stunning at first look but even more magnificent as you spend more and more time with each piece, you discover all the layers and details and you are rewarded even more strongly. Her layouts pop out of the page and since they are so three-dimensional, I am confident they are even more beautiful in person. While she uses a lot of layers, she also often has lots of whitespace and manages to balance both perfectly.

 

You might have seen Alexis’s work since she is published in well known magazines such as Scrapbooks Etc, Scrapbook Trends, and Scrapbook Answers. She is also on many design teams including Label Tulip, Crate Paper, Urban Lily, Dream Street Papers, and Project X.

 

If you haven’t seen her art before make sure to visit her blog.

 

 

 

 

Here is Alexis’s art with this week’s catalyst. You can click on it to see a larger version.

 

 

 

Alexis Says:

This catalyst spoke to me immediately. Every night, before bed, I set aside some time to read a good book. It’s my way of escaping the day and clearing my head so I can fall asleep peacefully. When I thought about how to represent that feeling artistically, I knew I had to incorporate actual book pages into the design with some splashes of my favorite colors. Overall, I think it really captures how it feels for me to escape into a good book!

 

Technique Highlight:

In order to connect the theme of the layout with my embellishments, I created my own flowers out of old pages from a Reader’s Digest. First, I laid three torn book pages on the large piece of scrap paper (to protect the floor). Next, I sprayed each page with turquoise and mimosa Glimmer Mist in smooth, sweeping layers and allowed them to dry. Then I cut two 4×4 squares and one 5×5 square from the misted book pages. I took a pencil and drew a spiral starting at the edges of each square, swirling in toward the middle (the spiral does not need to be exactly perfect). Next, I cut out the spiral and discarded the remaining paper. Finally, I started rolling the paper up, starting at the outer end. Don’t roll too tightly or your flower will appear closed. Keep rolling all the way up to the inside and you’ll find that you can use the last part of the spiral as a base for the flower. Play around with the layers, loosening them up where needed. You can use a Glue Dot at the base of the flower to hold it all together.

 

 

Thank you so much Alexis; we’re so very delighted.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team.

 

Amy:

Amy Says:

The contours of it have changed from time to time as my youngest has grown and schedules have changed, but something I do for myself is have coffee. I have coffee at home every morning, ideally in a span of quiet time I call my own before everyone wakes. But it is the act of “getting” coffee that has become routine and a bit of self-indulgence. My coffee is my just-for-me comfort, the one thing I do consciously as a treat to myself in the middle of the day or as the afternoon rush begins. I stop… for my coffee. The coffee cup here is made from cut-up coffee cards. That my birds took up residence in this piece speaks to their presence in my days. In truth, my birds have been entwined with my daily coffee… watching them, looking for them, drawing them, and writing about them…. often with coffee in hand.

 

 


Karen:

Karen Says:

It might seem silly but something I do for myself each day is to spend time with my son. I’ve always dreamt of staying home when I had children but as it works out, I am now working a full-time job so it’s really important to me to make sure I spend quality time with my son every single day. As much as I know my son loves it, too, it’s really something I do for myself.

 

Why is this in a binder?

 

 


Lia:

 

Lia Says:

Increasingly, 24 hours a day doesn’t seem to be sufficient for me – with most of my days taken up by work, household chores, and other responsibilities. With hardly an opportunity to do anything for myself, a few minutes sitting back and enjoying the aroma of my daily cuppa plus that soothing smooth taste of caffeine seems like a luxury. A luxury that I savor for it relaxes me and keeps me sane. Before I go back to the madness of daily life.

 

 


Fran:

Fran Says::

I try to keep my creative mind moving at all times. I try to spend at least a few minutes each day doing some sort of creative act every day – designing with paint, pen, fabric, fiber, or words. Every day I try to do something in my journal, if nothing else. This past few months, I’ve had difficulty keeping this promise to myself because of a wrist injury in my dominant hand, but it’s getting better and I’m looking forward to very creative times again soon.

 

 


Severine:

 

Severine Says:

Every day I sleep and for me it’s really important because when i sleep i dream, and do all the things I can’t really do in life and also accept and integrate all things I live in the day. That’s why i sleep for “myself”, becauseIt is a way for me to move forward.

 

In French:

Tous les jours et rien que pour moi je DORS !!! C’est une façon pour moi d’aller de l’avant. On dit que la nuit porte conseil, elle nous permet d’accepter tout ce qui nous est arrivé dans la journée, mais aussi de rêver et de faire des choses qui sont carrément impossible dans la VRAIE vie!!!

 

 


Lori:

 

Journaling Reads:

Just for me – reading my email while drinking my daily cup of coffee. It’s the perfect way to start my day.

 

Lori Says:

If I don’t get to read my email and drink my coffee every morning, I get a little grumpy. It’s a simple pleasure and one I indulge in every day.

 

 


Larissa:

 

Larissa Says:

I make art everyday.

 

 


Kimmi:

 

Journaling Reads:

Whether its a quick trip to Starbucks, a walk through the neighborhood, or a hot bubble bath with a glass of wine, I try to give myself at least twenty minutes each day of peace and quiet to relax and clear my thoughts.:

 

 

Technique Highlight:

I adhered my journaling strips to the mini bingo card that I stuck in a “pocket” behind my photo.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What’s something you do every day just for yourself? (If nothing comes to mind, create the art around what the one thing would be and why you’re not doing it.)” I urge you to give it a try. This was a particularly healing catalyst for our team, I hope it will prove to be that way for you, too. Embrace the healing power of art. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you.

 

Leave us comments with your work and you will qualify for the RAK we offer to a random participant. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 




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