creative Therapy


Catalyst Twenty
July 27, 2008, 7:02 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us. We will do a drawing for the RAK and announce the name mid-week. Make sure to read the RAK section this week, we’ve made some changes in the RAK qualification rules. And if you didn’t join us before, we hope you do this time.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number twenty:

 

How do you feel about your name?

 

We’re very excited to have Mou Saha as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

I find Mou’s art to be touching and unique. To me, her layouts are sophisticated and elegant; not too cluttered but never bare. The one thing all her layouts have in common is that she is always very inspiring.

 

Mou’s art has been published is almost every scrapbooking magazine and she is a 2007 Hall of Fame winner for Creating Keepsakes. She is on the design teams for Rusty Pickle, Luxe Designs, Cocoa Daisy, and Just Let Me Scrapbook! She’s also one of the five Scrapbooker of the Year finalists for this year.

 

You can see more of Mou’s art and read about her at her blog. We are thrilled to have her here.

 

 

 

Mou’s art with this catalyst is below and you can click it to see a bigger version.

 

 

 

Journaling Reads:

In Bengali, my name means ‘Honey’. My aunt chose my name. ‘A short and sweet name for my tiny niece’, she said. In school, my friends sometimes teased me calling me ‘honey bee’… but for some reason that never really bothered me. When I think of the nick name, I actually like it. I do love to keep myself busy as a bee. The most common compliment I get is ‘You are very sweet!’ But let me tell you this – I’m not ALL sweet. Bees sting when provoked. Well, I don’t sting, of course, but I can protect myself, if needed. So you see, the name fits! And I like that it does :)

 

 

Thank you so much Mou; we’re truly honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team. Click on the photos to see the bigger versions.

KL:

KL Says::

my name is more than who i am and yet it encompasses so much of everything i am and who i am as i live my life. i have a formal name, a friendly name, a mother’s name, a nickname and even some secret names, each of which are important pieces of me.

 

when i started creating with this week’s catalyst i had no plan, no real focus of what i would make or what i would say. but i heard one of my favorite songs, sky by joshua radin, and those beautiful lyrics showed me what i would focus on.

 

i thought of how i feel about me, and the name i have. what do i see. what do i feel. what do i know, and ultimately, what i forget. and i forget to remember me. i forget to love me. i forget to notice me. and this is a soft nudge, a gentle reminder that i am here. i have a name. i am worthy and whole and perfect just as i am. with all of the names that i know and hear.

 

Journaling Reads::

“sometimes i forget to love you like i should” – joshua radin

 

Technique Highlight::

i’ve been enjoying creating these in an old vintage music book, and this time i wanted to create something that was a bit more interactive. after creating the page with layered collage, gel medium and gesso i slit a tiny notch in the side along the binding and attached my large glitter “Y” with a ribbon. the tail tuck through the slit and attaches on the back, which will be hidden with the collage work on following page when i create again.

 

 


Amélie:

 

Amélie Says:

My last name has a noble connotation, that’s why I chose this image. In writing the words ‘once upon a time’ one can imagine the history of the entire family, the history of my ancestors. I am not a princess but which little girl never dreamt of being one?

 

In French:

Mon nom de famille a une connotation noble, voilà pourquoi j’ai choisi cette image. En écrivant les mots ‘il était une fois’ on peut imaginer l’histoire de toute la famille, l’histoire de mes ancètres. Je ne suis pas une princesse mais qui n’a jamais rêvé petite fille d’en être une?

 

Techniques Used:

collage, acrylics, 3D paint, varnish crackling, and paint crackling.

 

 


Fran:

 

Fran Says:

My given name, “Francine”, is a name with several connotations for me.

 

It’s a name that has always been unique; it’s a pretty name with a sophisticated sound to it. I’ve almost never been in a room with another Francine, where we both had to turn our heads! The name sounds a bit formal to me and it’s a name I used for my scholarly and professional pursuits prior to becoming a full-time artist. The name was chosen by my parents to honor, in the Jewish tradition, my great-grandmother, Fanny, who had passed before my birth.

 

One of the funny things about it is that it rhymes with my married last name, “Saperstein”. Francine Saperstein has a nice ring to it. However, I’ve also seen it with a very “prissy” feel to it. It’s quite formal and reminds me of a time when my goals were simply to be “the good daughter” or “obedient.” Perhaps that is why I have been introducing myself as “Fran” since becoming an artist.

 

“Fran” is more casual and describes my life now – casual, less structured, more relaxed. It’s really who I have become in many ways. Friends have always called me by this nickname… maybe I’ve learned to become my own friend? I do know, however, that I am much more comfortable with myself.

 

Technique Highlight:

Writing with Pigma Micron pen with Koi Watercolor background; doodling with Sakura Gelly Roll Metallic Pens.

 

 


Brenda:

 

Brenda Says:

This is Brenda……..she hates her name. Her message is “Celebrate your Bliss!” I have never liked my first name and didn’t use to like my middle name, which is Bliss. Now I love my middle name! My parents tried for 5 years to have me and when I came along….it was Bliss! I try to find The Bliss in all things…and Celebrate it!

 

 


Leena:

Leena Says:

Years ago, out of the blue I asked my folks how do they come about naming me. My dad told me that originally they wanted to name me Loh Lee Ta. Being a Chinese, Loh is my family name and Lee Ta will be my given name. I thought the name sounds good but to my understanding, my grandparents had adamantly protested against my folks naming me that. LOL! Yeah, I can understand how they felt because as a Chinese, they would want their future generation to be named with names with strong and meaningful characters so that they will lead a prosperous and successful life. Chinese names can come in thousands and thousands of characters. Some even hire “Feng Shui” master and spend lots of money to choose the most suitable name for their children.

 

However, my folks being English-educated don’t really bother about those Chinese old folks tales eventually named me Loh Lee Na. Sadly, I wasn’t educated in Chinese, so I don’t really know the meaning of my name, except the character “Lee” in Chinese partly means “Beautiful”. Well, I am more than happy that there’s a beauty character in my name which makes me feel really good.

 

I love the sound of my name whenever anyone address me Leena, be it they sometimes shorten it to ‘NaNa’ or ‘Nina’, it still means the same to me. I have always loved my name and will always do and I would never ever change it for any other names.

 

 


Karen:

 

Journaling Reads:

Yes, Karen is an ordinary name but when you remember that I was born and raised in Istanbul, Turkey, doesn’t it seem so much less ordinary? I love my name cause, in my own way, I feel like my parents must have known that I was going to end up needing a nice, American name so I love my name to bits.

 

 


Christine:

 

Journaling Reads:

When I was born, my parents originally named me Joann Beatrice Christine, but I was always called Christine. When I became a U.S. citizen, my legal name became Christine, and I am so thankful for that! I am really pleased with my name, and in recent years I’ve come to treasure it even more as I’ve grown spiritually. The reason for this is because of my name’s meaning: Christian – follower of Christ. My name is a constant reminder of my true identity in Christ. It points me back to whom I am following. As I journey on through life, I pray that the person I become eventually reflects the name that I bear…one who believes in and follows Jesus Christ wholeheartedly.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “how do you feel about your name?” I urge you to give it a try. Embrace the healing power of art. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you. Leave us comments with your work and we will send a RAK to a random participant. You’ll have to link your art by Sunday night, August 3rd, midnight PST to qualify for the RAK. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group. There’s a small change in RAK rules: to qualify for our weekly RAK drawing, all you have to do is do art around ANY of our catalysts. It doesn’t have to be the one from this week. We believe in the healing power of art and we want you to pick whichever catalyst inspires you the most.

 

For our RAK for this week, we are thrilled to be giving away beautiful stamps from our sponsor, Pink Persimmon. There are three stamp sets: Small Banner Set, Wise Old Owl, and Carnival Alpha (small). The alpha set works perfectly inside the banner set to create a word banner.

 

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



RAK Recipient for Catalyst Eighteen
July 24, 2008, 10:49 am
Filed under: other

catalyst_rak_winner

The little boy picked your name Deb. Congratulations!! Thanks, once again, to our generous sponsor: Hannah Grey. I will email you with directions on how to receive your RAK.

 

As always, I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone for your ongoing support, generosity of spirit, and for sharing your own journeys with us. It is so inspiring and therapeutic to me.

 

Thank you.

 



Catalyst Nineteen
July 20, 2008, 9:16 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us. We will do a drawing for the RAK and announce the name mid-week. And if you didn’t join us before, we hope you do this time.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number nineteen:

 

Create art around one of your quirks/idiosyncrasies.

 

We’re very excited to have Loretta Grayson as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

I first saw Loretta’s art at Two Peas in a Bucket. I had done a search for mini albums and this was one of the ones that came back. I loved her work in that instant. It’s so unique and stunning. The way she creates scenes with her paper and sewing machine is just amazing to me. Loretta designs for Two Peas in a Bucket and Cherry Arte, and she writes a regular feature for Australian magazine, Scrapbook Creations. She also does various other freelance teaching and designing.

 

As you’ll see, this week’s catalyst is no exception to Loretta’s unique style and her versatility of medium. If you haven’t seen Loretta’s art before, make sure to visit her blog. We are thrilled to have her here.

 

 

 

Loretta’s art with this catalyst is below and you can click it to see much more detail and a few photos of the full piece.

 

 

 

Loretta Says:

My Creative Therapy catalyst came at a particularly busy time of year for me, but it was also a perfect time to show one of my quirks/idiosyncrasies. Or to be more accurate, a whole town’s quirks and idiosyncrasies!

 

I work at an art gallery in a town in regional Queensland, Australia. Each year at the gallery we organise a “Tree Jumper” exhibition for our Jumpers and Jazz in July festival. To give you a little background, July is the middle of winter for us, and “jumpers” is an Australian word for sweaters. So essenially, the main aim of our festival is to create textile art jumpers to warm the deciduous trees in the main street of our town for a couple of weeks – and while the trees are warm in their jumpers, we warm ourselves at a large selection of social events, listening to great jazz bands. Other events include markets, textile art workshops and exhibitions, a sculpture symposium, and this year we added a “wearable art” parade.

 

I created two tree jumpers for this year’s festival, and this is my favourite of the two. Apart from the fact that to spend large amounts of time on the creation of a garment for a tree is quirky in itself, the process of making “Tree Hugger” says quite a lot about my quirks and idiosyncrasies.

 

1. Don’t tell me I can’t do something. I can’t really crochet. I’ve dabbled in the textile arts over the years, but I’m a papercrafter, essentially. I couldn’t tell you if I used a double or treble or quadruple or whatever stitch here. I’ve been told I hold the crochet hook in the wrong way. But when it came to this project, I made up my mind that I would crochet it, and that’s what I did – even if I had to make it up as I went along, while occasionally consulting a “Teach yourself crochet” book borrowed from my local library.

 

2. I need a certain amount of chaos. A little bit of stress in the form of a deadline is helpful to my creativity process, even though I may complain about it at the time. When my life is chaotic, I long for order. But too much order inevitably has me wishing for more chaos, and taking on yet another project.

 

3. I discovered that I would be very content to be in the business of creating made-to-measure tree couture. I might possibly leave my day job to do that. If anyone is interested in commissioning work, call me :)

 

Technique Highlight:

I tried to translate my papercraft style into yarn, and ended up with an odd kind of fusion. The jumper was created with individually crocheted circles, joined together to show a dark to light transition from the bottom to the top. The back of the garment is finished with a complex wavy line of clear buttons, a common inclusion in my paper projects. Final touches were borders of Hambly woodgrain overlay (one of my favourite products), and the “Tree Hugger” logo on the front, using plastic lettering and rub-ons.

 

 

Thank you so much Loretta; we’re truly honored.

 

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team. Click on the photos to see the bigger versions.

Karen:

Karen Says::

I never learned how to really drive until I was thirty. I left Turkey before the legal age to get a license (eighteen) and then went to college where I didn’t need a car. And then I lived in New York for seven years, where, again, you didn’t need a car. So I was almost thirty by the time we moved to San Diego where you couldn’t do anything without a car. Let me be the first to say that learning to drive at thirty is not the same as when you’re sixteen and dying to have some freedom. It’s scary.

 

So here we are, four years later, and now I can drive. Well, just barely. I still don’t get on the freeway. I am still pretty nervous. But, I can go to work, to the library, and grocery store. I can also go to David’s doctor’s and mine. That’s about all I need. For now at least. OH, have I mentioned I can’t ride a bike either? Yes, I know. I am transportation-challenged. Then again, I can walk just fine.

 

Most of the time.

 

Technique Highlight::

For this catalyst, I just picked a bunch of ribbons I liked and a piece of swirly chipboard. I painted the chipboard with stickles and edged around everything with ink. That’s about it.

 

 


Severine:

 

Severine Says:

Chocolate is my idiosyncrasies, i’ll be able to eat anything made with chocolate … :-)

 

Technique Highlight:

The background was made with gesso and orange/brown paint. Stamped with bubble wrap and gesso (for white) and distress age mahogany (for the red.)

 

 


Fran:

 

Fran Says:

I have so many quirks, as my husband reminded me when I told him what I was creating this journal page for… It was easy, though, for me to pick one. I have been spending a lot of time reading in preparation for our trip, and I noticed something about myself – I am unable to read anything, especially on the Internet or email, without editing it in my head.

 

I know what it’s from. It’s from years of being an editor. It’s from my love of English grammar and punctuation. It’s from my love of words. Even when I’m reading for pleasure, I catch myself re-reading certain sentences that sound “off” to me. I ask questions, like, “What is wrong with that sentence?” And, unfortunately, I am unable to move on to the next sentence until I figure out what is wrong.

 

It’s a quirk. It’s part of who I am, and, well, I can’t imagine it changing!

 

Technique Highlight:

Watercolor crayons used for the background. Text written with Pigma Micron. Drawing done with Pigma Micron and watercolor pencils.

 

 


Anita:

Anita Says:

Yep! That’s me! Nervous Nelly! I’m a nail full fledged nail biter. Been doing it as long as I can remember. I’ve tried everything to stop. I guess its just a part of me that will always be.

 

 


Kris:

 

Kris Says:

After I looked up what ‘idiosyncrasies’ and ‘quirks’ meant (so I could be clear), I explained to my children and asked them mine. The very first thing they both said was ‘you make lots of faces.’ I said ‘What?’ ‘Like that!’ they laughed.

 

Okay, so I do. I’m an expressive person. I use my eyes, mouth and gesturing hands to convey what I’m saying. I don’t do it on purpose, its just how I’m built. My teen says I can change my persona just by making a new face. I guess I’m creating myself over and over again. I see some of the same expressions in my mother and now my littlest daughter is becoming a carbon copy of me. Both my kids and I are big eyerollers, grimacers (is that a word) and exaggerated shock face showers. It’s just how we roll.

 

I wouldn’t want to be any other way.

 

Technique Highlight:

My favorite little trick on this piece I learned from Corey Moortgat’s book ‘The Art of Personal Imagery’. I swipe painted the background aqua, around my head. Let it dry. Then I randomly dry brushed olive green over that paint. Then I took a big paintbrush, dipped in water and flicked it onto the paint. I waited until the paint was dry and then wiped off the water, removing the top layer of paint where the drops were, revealing the bottom color. Love that.

 

 


Lori:

 

Lori Says:

I have to do this same routine every night before going upstairs. If I don’t do it, I cannot sleep. Maybe I’ve seen too many horror films in my day, but I need to check the closets to make sure no one is in there. I have no idea what I’d do if I actually found someone hiding. I shudder at the thought. I have no idea why I need to open the bathroom door, either. It’s odd, but I need it open. After I’ve done my little routine, I can finally turn off the lights and head upstairs for the night.

 

Journaling Reads:

A. Lock the front door.

B. Check the hall closet for the Boogeyman.

C. Check the playroom closet for the Boogeyman and shut the door.

D. Lock the garage door.

E. Open the bathroom door.

F. Turn the lights off.

 

Technique Highlight:

Sometimes the best looking embellishments are cut outs of patterned paper. This new October Afternoon paper is so yummy, I had to embellish using the little orange flowers from one paper and the brown brocade from another. It’s quick and saves money, too.

 

 


Amélie:

 

Amélie Says:

I chose to represent a girl dreamer like me. A girl whose head is often in the clouds. The table has a writing ‘dreams’ in the context and ‘in my head the birds sing.’ I wanted to make this creation in soft and colorful tones close to nature that I love. My great quirk is that I dream a lot, I forget a lot of things because of my daydreams.

 

In French:

“J’ai fait un tableau à mon image. Je suis quelqu’un de très étourdie, toujours la tête dans les nuages. J’oublie tout à cause de mes rêveries. C’est vraiment une de mes particularité. J’ai choisi des couleurs douces et coloré et une décoration nature que j’aime. Sur le tableau on peut lire dans le cadre “Songes” et la phrases dit : “dans ma tête les oiseaux chantent”.

 

Pour les techniques utilisées : collage, acryliques, peintures 3D, transferts, papiers déchirés, pochoir, mouchoir, pâte à structure, glimmer mist, tampons”

 

Technique Highlight:

I used collage, transfer, pochoire, acrylics, 3D paint, tearing paper, glimmer mist, and stamps. Pochoire is a process of using a very dry soft brush and the tiniest bit of gouche with a stencil. It creates almost an airbrushed look.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “One of your quirks/idiosyncrasies.” I urge you to give it a try. Embrace the healing power of art. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you. Leave us comments with your work and we will send a RAK to a random participant. You’ll have to link your work by Sunday night, July 27th, midnight PST to qualify for the RAK. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

For our RAK for catalyst #19, we are thrilled to be giving away a $25 gift certificate to sponsor, Ma Vinci’s Reliquary:

 

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



RAK recipient for Catalyst Seventeen
July 16, 2008, 4:12 pm
Filed under: catalyst

catalyst_rak_winner

The little boy picked your name Kim. Congratulations!! Thanks, once again, to our generous sponsor: Scrap Lovers. I will email you with directions on how to receive your RAK.

 

As always, I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone for your ongoing support, generosity of spirit, and for sharing your own journeys with us. It is so inspiring and therapeutic to me.

 

Thank you.

 



Catalyst Eighteen
July 13, 2008, 9:34 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us. We will do a drawing for the RAK and announce the name mid-week. And if you didn’t join us before, we hope you do this time.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number eighteen:

 

What’s your favorite place in your house, and why?

 

We’re very excited to have Amy Cowen as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

I first found Amy’s podcast through Ali Edwards. As soon as I listened to her podcast, I knew I wanted to hear more so I went back and downloaded all the older ones. She’s now a staple of my morning commute. I love listening to her talk about art and life on my way to and from work. Just like this site, the show isn’t specific to one form of art. It covers many aspects of creativity, including sketching, quilting, and knitting.

 

Her thoughts and comments always make me think and make me want to be at home, creating. She has a monthly ATC exchange, some really wonderful music, and even reviews books from time to time. Amy’s voice is always very calm and soothing to me. Her podcasts are interesting and well organized so each episode is like a wonderful story I get to hear that week.

 

If you haven’t ever heard an episode of the Creative Mom Podcast, I cannot recommend it enough. The CMP is in its third year of production and it’s about art and creativity and it’s so rich in content that you will be hooked in no time. Amy also blogs (a bit sporadically) at Threaded Thoughts. We are thrilled to have her here.

 

 

 

Amy’s art with this catalyst is below and you can click it to see the larger version.

 

 

 

Amy Says:

From the moment I saw this catalyst, my response was “my poppy chair.” In truth, there are two “poppy chairs” in our living room. A matching pair. In truth, I doubt anyone other than me understands that one of them, the one by the window on the right side of the small end table, is mine… “my chair.” And yet, it is… one of them is “my chair” in my head. Quilts that are special to me hang on the back. A patchwork pillow I made last month that is symbolic of my recent birthday sits in the corner of the chair. The chair is in the colors that define the feel of our house. The soft gold tones and all-over poppy pattern are comforting for me.

 

Over the last year or so, my creative patterns and habits have evolved into set patterns that help structure and define my days and give me a sense of balance. On regular days, I try to get up an hour or so before my house wakes so that I can have a cup of coffee in quiet, can do my daily sketch, and can see the transition and progression of morning light. I sit in my poppy chair.

 

In the Bay Area, space is at a premium, and we don’t have a large house. I don’t have a separate room or space in which I do all the creative things I do… no studio… no spare room… no art closet. At times, I work in the kitchen, my paints and projects all spread out over the stove. In the last year, I’ve also begun working a good bit in the dining room, fabric spread all around me. But, “my poppy chair” is a center of my creative work. My morning time is there. My laptop is on the small table there, so I write there on and off throughout the day, every day. I work on pulling together the Creative Mom Podcast there each week. I paint there in the evenings as I work on my monthly ATCs for the CMP exchange. I knit there. I work in my journal sketchbooks there. I draw my shipping tags there. I study my bird books there. I sit there and sew up seams on quilted pillows and pen pouches that I sell. And, importantly, from “my poppy chair,” I can see out the window.

 

From “my poppy chair,” I can look out into the tall trees that stand on the hillside behind our backyard. In those trees, I have watched the birds this year. I am working on both a book manuscript about birds and a year-long series of shipping tags, a process which now revolves, in large part, around bird art and the drawing of birds. From my chair, I watch the birds. I write about the birds. I sketch the birds. I paint birds. I sew up pieces that involve birds.

 

In my heart, it is “my poppy chair.”

 

Although I knew from the beginning that my “chair” was my focus for this catalyst, I didn’t decide ahead of time what format my response was going to take. I’ve been on vacation, and when I got back and ready to begin my piece last week, I had an image in my head of my chair done in collage. I’ve been working with collaged birds done from catalog papers. But as I visualized my chair during the two weeks I was away on the Oregon coast, I wondered about doing my chair in fabric-based collage instead. The collage, however, was only to be a portion of my piece. I was thinking of my response as a combination of mediums and including pen and ink, which is my primary medium right now. I also wanted to include a set of graphic novel panels because that is a format I work with often right now. But, as the chair took shape in fabric, I started seeing the possibilities of focusing in and doing this piece completely fabric-based and trying to tie in the other elements and tell the story entirely in fabric. As I worked, I began tightening my response as it became clear to me that despite all the other things I do in “my poppy chair,” the birds and the bird art are most important right now.

 

I’ve just begun journal quilting this year, having been inspired immensely by the work of Gooma8x and then spending a lot of time looking at books on journal quilting and most recently becoming enamored with the work of Joan Colvin. This is a new medium for me. I’ve only done a couple of pieces. After I created the chair, I put it down on a piece of background fabric and started adding to the overall piece, bit by bit, and letting the fabric tell the story and create the mood. I integrated my love of pen and ink with the miniature fabric shipping tags which are reduced and printed copies of a few of the daily shipping tags I’ve drawn this year… in my morning time in “my poppy chair.”

 

 

Thank you so much Amy; we’re truly honored.

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team. Click on the photos to see the bigger versions.

KL:

KL Says::

i was thinking about this catalyst all week. trying to figure out which “room” or which “place” in our home was my favorite. is it my scrap table where i create? is it one of the children’s rooms, or the family room, where they spend so much time playing and laughing. is it the kitchen, where we eat and sit together for every meal?

 

but then i began thinking about my childhood and remembering where i always spent most of my time… outside. running and laughing and spending time with friends and family and soaking up the sun. and truly, it is my favorite place in my home. outside. our backyard. i haven’t been making being outside a priority lately, but this catalyst has brought to my attention again how much being outside is a part of me, and how it recharges my soul.

 

Technique Highlight::

my work for this week is basically a 2.5″ x 2.5″ chipboard piece that i layered with scraps of paper and rubons. the hanging butterfly with the word “outside” is the reverse of a butterfly punch that i put on transparency and hung from the back of the base piece, which helps it look like the butterfly is floating in air.

 

 


Fran:

 

Fran Says:

My favorite room in my house is, hands down, my studio. I spend all my days in there and I miss it when I’m not in there. It’s where I create, where I make my messes, where I can be free to play with whatever strikes my fancy. The studio is filled with art I have created, art friends, family and other artists have created. It’s a place where I am always myself. And, no matter what my mood, no matter what else is going on, my studio is my sanctuary.

 

Technique Highlight:

This is a photograph my water canister, where I rinse my brushes. I used PhotoShop’s “photocopy” filter to create this image and then I altered it with colored pencils, Glaze Gelly Roll pens from Sakura, and journaled with Pigma Microns.

 

 


Severine:

 

Severine Says:

I like to seat on deck in the sun on the terrace and listen to the pine apples packed with the sun.

 

In French:

J’aime me mettre sur le transat au soleil sur la terrasse et écouter les pignes craquer avec le soleil.

 

Technique Highlight:

Photos are printed at home and tasks was made by alcohols ink and liquid distress.

 

 


 

Christine:

Christine Says:

Our formal dining room is a place that has become dear to my heart. It’s a place where our family and guests gather together during the holidays and on special occasions. On other days, it’s where I spend some of my time creating scrapbook pages and cards. It’s a room filled with lots of natural light, and it has the best views of the mountains and hills of the countryside surrounding our neighborhood. Being in it just makes me feel happy!

 

Technique Highlight:

Sometimes letter stickers are difficult to see against backgrounds such as the patterned paper that I used in this project. A simple way to make each letter easier to view is to ink the edges with a marker. Sponging on ink from an ink pad can also be done to add a distinguishing line around the letters.

 

 


 

Karen:

 

Karen Says:

When I first thought of this catalyst, I was going to make it about our living room. It’s the room where I scrap, where David plays, and where the TV is. For me, that makes it the best room. Then I thought I might do it about the garden. I’ve never lived in a house that had a garden, so I think it’s so special and I thought it would be worthy of the catalyst. Then I realized that the thing I love the most is that we live in a house.

 

I grew up in a big city where there are no houses, only apartment buildings. So living in a house, having my own backyard, my own little space on the street, my own driveway: it all makes me so happy. It’s something I always wanted as a kid. And it’s something I love. I don’t even care that I don’t own it or that it’s falling apart a bit. I love living in it. I love my house. My yard. My driveway. All of it.

 

Technique Highlight:

I wanted to have fun with this one and make it look like a child’s drawing to represent how it was my childhood dream and something I could have done at the time. Instead of drawing it, I used patterned paper and chipboard to “draw” the scene. I put Stickles on the sun and birds’ wings to give the sense of them shimmering. I put some photos to show us living in the house. I then sewed all around to make it seem like it was a framed scene.

 

 


Leena:

 

Leena Says:

This is the place where I spent most of my time, when I’m not with my family. I find solace in this corner of my study. This is the place where I have some peace and quiet when everyone’s asleep at night. This is my sanctuary. I could spend hours at a time reading, catching up with my friends online, working on my scrapbooking projects, listening to my favourite music, complete the datelines of my day job workload. This is the place I love to put my feet up and and just relax and think of happy thoughts. And this is the place I found myself.

 

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What’s your favorite place in your house, and why?” I urge you to give it a try. Embrace the healing power of art. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you. Leave us comments with your work and we will send a RAK to a random participant. You’ll have to link your work by Sunday night, July 20th, midnight PST to qualify for the RAK. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

For our RAK for catalyst #18, we are thrilled to be giving away a $25 gift certificate to sponsor: Hannah Grey:

 

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



RAK recipient for Catalyst Sixteen
July 9, 2008, 7:53 pm
Filed under: other

 

catalyst_rak_winner

 

The little boy picked your name craftylyra. Congratulations!! Thanks, once again, to our generous sponsor: Maya Road. I will email you with directions on how to receive your RAK.

 

As always, I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone for your ongoing support, generosity of spirit, and for sharing your own journeys with us. It is so inspiring and therapeutic to me.

 

Thank you.

 



Catalyst Seventeen
July 6, 2008, 8:37 am
Filed under: catalyst

 

As always, thank you to all of our visitors and all the encouraging comments you left for us. For those of you who did, thank you for playing along with us. We will do a drawing for the RAK and announce the name mid-week. And if you didn’t join us before, we hope you do this time.

 

Ok! Here’s catalyst number seventeen:

 

What’s the one quality you look for in a romantic partner?

 

We’re very excited to have Shimelle Laine as this week’s Guest Artist.

 

I can’t remember how I found Shimelle but I can tell you that I fell in love immediately with her wonderful attitude, her amazing style, and unique personality. She travels all over the world teaching classes and although I’ve never been lucky enough to take one of the ones in person, last Christmas, I took Shimelle’s Journal Your Christmas class and I loved every moment of it. I love her attention to journaling. Her emphasis on using what you have and not saving those papers for a special occasion.

 

She’s now offering another amazing class called “My Freedom” and she now has a new store where you can get goodies! If you haven’t ever read her blog, you must check it out. She has the most amazing and unique personality and her interpretation of this week’s catalyst is no exception. We are so overjoyed to have her here.

 

 

 

Shimelle’s art with this catalyst is below and you can click it to see the larger version.

 

 

 

Shimelle Says:

If anyone picks up my handbag, they instantly make some comment about it being too heavy. ‘What on earth could you have in here?’ Well, the answer is usually pretty simple: I have craft supplies, a scruffy handmade book and a camera. Doesn’t everyone?

 

In all seriousness, it started with carrying a notebook and grew to this basic set of supplies that I carry pretty much everywhere. Every so often, I make a new book…sometimes with a theme, sometimes without. Always abiding by my own personal rule of stash: use it while you love it. {Because if I save it long enough, I won’t like it any more…so what exactly am I saving it for?} Like I love the Amy Butler papers, but I only found them in a huge tablet set. So now I have made aproximately six million layouts with it and I still have half the tablet left. So I set to chopping up quite a few sheets of that and some odd bits of cardstock to make a very simple stack book that is 4×6 in size. No fancy binding because this book will get beat up in my handbag. And I’m fine with that — the rough-around-the-edges look is quite endearing with these. A bit like a worn old teddy bear. So I just punch a hole in every page and stick a ring through to hold it all together, then I add an extra hole to the front cover so I can tie my pen to the book. Because there may be eight pens in my handbag on any given day and yet when I want one, I won’t be able to find it. Perhaps I should stop with the explanation of my highly disorganized nature.

 

The rest of my travelling craft kit includes a polaroid camera (I alternate carrying that or my regular camera in my bag…or both if I can’t decide), scissors to cut things from newspapers, maps, ticket stubs or whatever else along with a stapler and glue to attach those things to pages. Then whenever I am sitting on a picnic blanket or sitting on the train or standing in a queue or whenever else, I can jot things down, be they short ideas or extended stories that flow from page to page…some truth, some fiction. Whatever the day may bring. Along with a gathering of photos, drawings and ephemera from the world that day.

 

Why is this my response to this catalyst? Many reasons…

*Because I can’t narrow it down to one quality.

*Because I am the sort of person who would rather keep those ideas behind the cover.

*Because I’m getting married next month so right now is a rather giddy time when everything is lovely and I’m grateful for everything that exists in the entire world (or so it seems) and it’s a sensation that is pretty unique to the situation (or so I think). So I expect I shall carry this book right through the summer until the big day arrives. Filled with notes for things we need to plan, places we have to go, returned RSVP cards, emails from friends, magazine clippings…and many, many notes on how lovely it feels this summer, as if everything is right in the world.

*Because there is never anything wrong with recording the happy. Somewhere in there will be days of not happy. Days of something not working out, of friends not able to be here, of something that has gone slightly wrong. And recording it all in a book means I can look back and put things in the balance.

 

And that is my kind of therapy indeed.

 

 

Thank you so much Shimelle; we’re truly honored.

 


Here are some interpretations of the catalyst from members of our team. Click on the photos to see the bigger versions.

Anita:

Journaling Reads::

He is…God-fearing, compassionate, loving, tender, accepting, an awesome father, patient, hard working, kind, and he loves ME! I am blessed with such an awesome man. We just celebrated our 10th anniversary and I would take back one year of our marriage. God certainly knew what He was doing when He brought Brad into my life.

 


Fran:

 

Fran Says:

What do I look for in a romantic partner? Well, I haven’t had to look far for over 19 years! But for me the quality I most looked for was a soulmate. And I’ve found that.

 

Nineteen years ago, I met the man who I now call my husband, Dave. It was an instant connection. We were drawn to each other immediately and I think we both “knew” early on that this was “it”. I don’t think that one quality alone necessarily makes a romantic partner attractive and “the right one”. Rather, it’s the combination of all of those amazing traits – wit, intelligence, compassion, handsome, easy smile, etc. – that makes a person romantically attractive. For me, I searched for a soulmate.

 

Technique Highlight:

Use fluid acrylics on cold press watercolor paper to create background. Alter a photo in PhotoShop Elements to a “stamp” or “photocopy” style. Print image in black and white on a laser printer (or go and copy at a copy machine). Transfer image onto background using soft gloss gel medium. I added doodling and text with Glaze pens by Sakura.

 


Karen:

 

Journaling Reads:

Maybe it’s weird that a quality I look for in others should be about me, but the more I think, the more I realize that the number one quality I look for in a romantic partner is that they make me want to be a better me. No scratch that. That they make me want to be the best me. What excites me the most is meeting someone I respect. Someone whom I look up to. Someone who inspires me to be better.

 


 

Karan:

Karan Says:

When I was dating in my early 20’s, I had a list of criteria I looked for in a potential boyfriend. A Job was a big priority then. Someone mature, who wanted a serious relationship, leading to marriage and a family. I have always looked for someone a little different from the average guy. My first husband was all of these things. European, raised in England, with a cool British accent, had a great job, and wanted to own his own business. The next time I was single, I wanted to find someone fun. I had spent the past several years with a very serious man who was a workaholic… I wanted someone with a sense of humor, who loved kids, and would be good to my daughter. I chose a man who had the qualities I wanted, as well as some negative ones that ended in me being a single mother with two small children. The next time, I looked for humor, kindness, and a man who would be good to my kids and me. He was funny, and a hard worker, kind and romantic, and wanted to have kids of his own, but adored mine as well, and never treated mine any different from his own once we had them. I realized, at the end of that marriage, that I never really looked at the little things that were important to me. So, single again, I got more specific…

 

I wanted a man who was kind above all. Someone well liked for his sense of humor, someone everyone loved and admired. I wanted a man who loved children, and would want to be a part of a very unconventional extended family. I wanted someone who was intelligent, who liked to do the same things as me, and actually enjoyed shopping at garage sales and antique stores, and wouldn’t cringe when I asked him to stop to pick something up off the side of the road. I wanted someone who wasn’t a workaholic or a sports fanatic. I really wanted to find someone who was well traveled, and knew a lot about the world, and wanted to travel with me.

 

It is amazing… when I did my visualization exercises… I thought about all of these things. A month later, he came into my life. He had all the things I was looking for, and so many more I didn’t even know I wanted. He fit so seamlessly into our life, like he had always belonged. I learned after meeting him, that you have to know what you want in a partner. The universe is just waiting to send you the right person, but you have to be very specific… Sometimes the things you think you want, end up being the exact things you hate about your spouse in the end. I like to think I got wiser as I grew older, but often, I just feel lucky. He has brought out all the beauty in me that no one else ever looked deep enough to find. He loves me unconditionally, and thinks I am wonderful. Finding him at almost the half way point in my life, was an incredibly wonderful thing. I am so looking forward to growing with him. Every day is like the first day. I still get goosebumps when I hear his voice on the phone. Building a life and creating a home and family with him, are the best things I have done so far.


 

Kris:

 

Kris Says:

They say laughter is the best medicine. I met my husband while in junior high school and he used to make me laugh all the time. The first time I met him, he came to my house with my then-boyfriend and promptly asked me if I had any eggs. They proceeded to crack the eggs into their mouths and swallow. I guess they thought it would impress me. After that he was unshakable. Always around, always making me laugh. And as we celebrate our 20th anniversary next week, I’m glad I’m able to say I still like him and he still makes me laugh.

 

Technique Highlight:

On the canvas I added modeling paste with a pallet knife.. Then I dragged red and aqua acrylic paint across with a credit card. I added a heart with fluid acrylics. Stamped with French script. After that I embellished with a picture from a magazine, pieces from a bracelet (the glasses), rubons, stickers and black oil pastel crayon.

 


Lori:

 

Journaling Reads:

It’s not the big gestures that made me fall for you. It is all the small ones. Somehow you always know when I need you, and those small gestures tell me often that you are listening to me and thinking of me. Knowing that I’m loved, thought of, and listened to, is what makes me feel romanced. It’s all I need to feel loved and content. You know me better than anyone and that is the ultimate romantic gesture for me. You never try to change me. You just love me.

 


Vivian:

 

Vivian Says:

No second thoughts on this weeks’ catalyst. Honesty is definitely one quality I look for (and have found) in my partner, amongst lots of other things. Without honesty, to me a relationship is not worth very much at all.. Without honesty there is no respect, no self worth, no real valuation of the other. Everything starts at being completely honest with each other…

 

Technique Highlight:

I scratched this picture lightly with some sandpaper and then rubbed the scratches with some metallic oil pastels. crafty feel. i used strips of pattern paper {october afternoon} with matte gel medium and then painted it with layers of gesso for a white washed look. and of course, i can’t create without little bits of vintage embellishments.

 


 

Now it’s your turn: show us your therapeutic art around “What’s the one quality you look for in a romantic partner?” I urge you to give it a try. Embrace the healing power of art. It can be any form of art as long as it speaks to you. Leave us comments with your work and we will send a RAK to a random participant. You’ll have to link your work by Sunday night, July 13th, midnight PST to qualify for the RAK. If you don’t have a community or blog where you upload photos, you can upload them on our flickr group.

 

For our RAK for catalyst #17, we are thrilled to be giving away a $25 gift certificate to our sponsor, Scrap Lovers:

 

 

 

Remember, this is not a competition. If your art makes you feel even a bit better at the end, you’ve won.

 

Until next week, enjoy each and every moment.

 

 



RAK recipient for Catalyst Fifteen
July 1, 2008, 9:19 pm
Filed under: other

 

catalyst_rak_winner

 

The little boy picked your name JoEllyn. Congratulations!! Thanks, once again, to our generous sponsor: Happy N Scrappin’. I will email you with directions on how to receive your RAK.

 

As always, I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone for your ongoing support, generosity of spirit, and for sharing your own journeys with us. It is so inspiring and therapeutic to me.

 

Thank you.

 




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